Yankee Judgernaut Rolls On

After 5 straight games scoring at least 8 runs, the Yankees reached the 60 game mark scoring 353 runs and belting 102 home runs, the latter a new Yankee record, and the former the third highest Yankee total of the expansion era.

Leading the Pinstripers is phenom Aaron Judge, boasting leading marks in the AL triple crown categories, other AL firsts in WAR, walks, runs, total bases and runs created, and 2nd place in OBP, SLG, OPS, oWAR and right field TZR. More after the jump.

Five straight games of 8+ runs is the longest Yankee streak of the expansion era, and part of 21 such games over their first 60, tied with the 114-48 club of 1998 and the most since the DiMaggio Yankees of 1939. Those ’39 Bombers are also the last Yankee team with more than the 11 games of 10+ runs that this year’s club has posted over its first 60 contests. At its current pace, New York will score 953 runs for the season, within range of the 1998 (965) and 2007 (968) clubs that have the highest Yankee totals since their 1930s teams.

New York’s 102 homers are 7 more than the last Yankee world championship team in 2009, and 23 more than the 1961 club that famously featured a pair of Yankees chasing the Babe‘s then record total of 60 in a season. Mickey Mantle had 19 round-trippers at this point in the 1961 season with Roger Maris at 22, one more than the 21 dingers that Judge has belted (the most home runs by a Yankee after 60 games are 27, by Ruth in 1928 and Mantle in 1956). Projected to a full season, New York would belt 275 round-trippers this year, 30 more (!) than the record total of the 2012 team, and 35 more than the 1961 club.

Judge’s 21 home runs project to 57 for the season, a total that would smash Mark McGwire‘s rookie record of 49 in 1987 (McGwire had 20 home runs at this point of the season). Judge’s current .344 BA is within striking range of Ichiro‘s .350 mark in 2001 (ichiro was at .356 after 60 games), the highest rookie BA since George Watkins’ .373 in 1930. Judge’s current .450 OBP has been bettered only by Shoeless Joe Jackson (.468 in 1911) in a rookie season, while his current SLG (.718), OPS (1.168) and OPS+ (202) all lead the best rookie season totals.  

Judge’s current 4.1 WAR projects to 11.1 for the season, a total that would surpass Mike Trout‘s rookie record of 10.8 WAR in 2012. Judge’s (.450) and Trout’s (.461) OBP marks so far this season are on pace to match or better Jim Thome‘s .450 OBP in 1996, the best of the expansion era in an age 25 season. Similar story for SLG with Trout (.742) and Judge (.718) trailing only Babe Ruth’s .847 in 1920 among 25 year-olds. For OPS and OPS+ at age 25, Trout (1.203/222) and Judge (1.168/2.02) sandwich Mantle (1.177/221 in 1957) and trail only Ruth (1.379/255). For WAR per PA among qualified age 25 seasons, Trout and Judge this season are trailing only Ruth and Mantle.

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31 Comments on "Yankee Judgernaut Rolls On"

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Voomo Zanzibar
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Watkins hit .373

Paul E
Guest

Yes. And never hit like that again. Kind of odd, no?

Doug
Guest

He was a 30 year-old rookie, so decline phase would probably hit pretty quickly.

no statistician but
Guest

Doug: I think you’re looking at the wrong ’30.’ The year was 1930, when the NL collectively batted .303, and Watkins was one of ten starters or platooners on the Cards who hit .300 plus. His .373 in 424 PAs was second on the team, actually, to Showboat Fisher’s .374 in 286 PAs. Given Watkins’ high figure, he was still only 6th in the league in BA, and all of those ahead of him had far more PAs. Virtually veryone dropped off in subsequent years, not just Watkins, by the way.

no statistician but
Guest

Not to go off on a tangent, but the 1930 and 1931 Cardinals, NL champs both years, had very similar stats, despite dropping from 1004 to 815 runs scored and from784 to 614 runs allowed. They finished first in the league both years in doubles, second in triples, fifth in HRs, third in BA, second in ERA and runs allowed. The team OPS+ both years: 98. The team’s ERA+ both years: 116.

Paul E
Guest

and, the Cardinals’ Pythagorean W/L is .639 and .638 – that’s incredibly consistent

Paul E
Guest

Forget that comment – per baseball reference it’s .630 versus .610 for Pythagorean calcualtions
Mea culpa

Ken
Guest

One of my favorite stats on the decline of offense from 1930 to 1931 was Chuck Klein’s RBI totals. In 1930 he had 170, but did not lead the league. In 1931 he had 121, a drop of 49, but DID lead the league.

Paul E
Guest

How about that Harry Lumley? Brooklyn slugger of the early 20th century, probably the ‘oddest’ of the 25 year old leaders for OPS+. Not a great career as injuries wrung him out…..

Doug
Guest
6.2 WAR for age 25, 3.0 WAR for the rest of his career. Only rookie to lead his league in 3B, HR and SO. Lumley’s 134 career OPS+ is second only to Kal Daniels (138) among players with 300 R and 300 RBI in a career of fewer than 3000 PA. Was made Player-Manager in 1909, and stopped putting himself in the lineup (55 games that year, after 127 the previous year before a broken ankle shelved him for the rest of the season). Brooklyn lost 98 games in 1909 (actually a small improvement) but Lumley’s managerial career was over,… Read more »
Paul E
Guest

Kalvaski was the bomb. An absolute on-base machine who drive the ball…and couldn’t stay healthy

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

As of right now, Joey Gallo has the only season with 200+ PA and
BA under .200 (.199)
SLG over .500 (.510)

If he keeps it up (down), he’ll be on an island.
Next best (worst):

.217 … Ryan Schimpf
.227 … Carlos Pena
.231 … Art Shamsky
.233 … Sam Horn
.235 … Paul Sorrento

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

Ian Happ just had the 10th searchable game with
4+ RBI and
4+ SO

All since 1982.
But only once since 2003.
Derek Norris in this game:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/SDN/SDN201505290.shtml

Doug
Guest

Six of the ten, including Happ, had a grannie account for all of the RBI. Reggie Jackson did it twice, both after age 35.

Happ now has one, two, three and four-run home runs, all in his first 27 games. All six of his home runs have come on the first or second pitch.

David P
Guest

Interesting article by Ben Lindbergh showing that the recent increase in home runs is likely due to a juiced ball.

https://theringer.com/2017-mlb-home-run-spike-juiced-ball-testing-reveal-155cd21108bc

And note that one of the comments on the article is by TAFKAJA (The Artists Formerly Known As John Autin).

Doug
Guest

Really interesting article, David. Thanks.

e pluribus munu
Guest

Seeing John and Doug on the same comment string brought to the surface some nostalgia. John’s reservations notwithstanding, I thought the argument by Lindbergh was well articulated and pretty nuanced.

David P
Guest
While most teams now eschew the bunt, the Indians continue to use it in situations that make absolutely no sense. Last night was a prime example. They’re facing Nik Turley, a 27 year old rookie and former 50th round draft pick, making his second career start. So Clayton Kershaw he ain’t. In the first inning, Turley hits a batter and gives up a double. Now in the second, he starts the inning by giving up 3 singles. So he’s clearly struggling. In steps, Lonnie Chisenhall with runners on first and second, no one out. Now granted, Chisenhall often sits against… Read more »
Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

Mashiro Freakin TaWacky

4 IP
10 SO
8 H
5 ER

10 SO with no more than 4 IP has now been done 7 times.
All since 2013.

Doing it and giving up 5+ ER?
Tanaka is number 3.

He joins Noah Syndegaard and Danny Salazar:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/SDN/SDN201506020.shtml
http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CHA/CHA201404100.shtml

David P
Guest

Odd that Tanaka has been by far the Yankees worst starter, given that coming into the season he was considered the only starter they could rely on.

On the plus side, they won´t have to get into a bidding war this offseason to retain his services. Pretty much guaranteed that he’ll opt-in to the final 3 years of his contract.

David P
Guest

Yanks are now 5 games behind their Pythagorean record, which is quite strange since they’ve outperformed their Pythagorean record almost every year for the past 25 years or so.

David P
Guest

Last Yankees team to finish more than 5 games below their Pythagorean record was the ’75 team which went 83-77 vs a 91-69 Pythagorean record.

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