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Graham Womack
9 years ago

Good work, my friend.

bstar
bstar
9 years ago

Love it, Andy. Those ’73 Topps(Brohamer) were my first pack of cards ever, at age 5. They cost me five cents.

Luis Gomez
Luis Gomez
9 years ago
Reply to  bstar

Oh, do I miss those days…

Majik
Majik
9 years ago
Reply to  bstar

’73 was my first year of collecting and I had that Brohamer as well. I could swear the packs cost 10 cents, though. 15 cents the next year.

bstar
bstar
9 years ago
Reply to  Majik

I was only 5. I do remember telling people for years that my first pack cost five cents, but children are good at embellishing facts. I’d say the truth probably lies with you.

Diane
9 years ago

I wish I had the artistic skills to do this …

Andy
Andy
9 years ago
Reply to  Diane

It’s all just Photoshop.

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
9 years ago

Nice, Andy. Funny stuff.

Dan Franzen
9 years ago

Now all we need is a “Jack Go under Limbo Stick” …

John Autin
Editor
9 years ago

How ’bout a “rub-a-dub-dub” theme, with the 3 recent megamillion-dollar first basemen? Surely there are pictures of each one in a whirlpool….

stealing home
9 years ago

BOOOOOOO on the candlestick

Chris
Chris
9 years ago

Funny stuff. The best Jack Clark baseball card is from the 1982 Fleer set. It shows the umpire ringing him up for a called strike (three?).

bstar
bstar
9 years ago

This is the first vote for “more, please.”

Tmckelv
Tmckelv
9 years ago

Beautiful work Andy! Those updates are flawless.

Nice pull on the OPC Jack Clark (as opposed to topps).

The Brohamer card has 2 of my favorite baseball card features – the Rookie Trophy and a very discernible second player (a young Bobby Grich!) in the action photo.

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
9 years ago
Reply to  Tmckelv

Let me join the chorus – very creative, great job Andy. I loved those little trophies on the front of the cards, I remember those from the late 60s/early 70s cards that I used to buy as a kid.

Here’s an unrelated question – when did baseball players start to wear eyeblack? Early 60s? I certainly don’t recall any pre-WWII guys doing that.

John Autin
Editor
9 years ago
Reply to  Lawrence Azrin

Believe it or not, there’s a web page called History of EyeBlack:
http://www.eyeblack.com/blog/news/history-of-eyeblack

Some other info on eyeblack history:
http://www.unh.edu/inquiryjournal/05/articles/powers.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye_black

A couple of sources say the first athlete noticed for doing it regularly was Redskins fullback Andy Farkas in 1942. But they also say that Babe Ruth tried it in the ’30s.

Tmckelv
Tmckelv
9 years ago

I have never seen the Fleer Ultra set you show there. It is nice. Did you get that Jack Wilson autograph in person (if it in fact does say “Jack Wilson”)?

Andy
Andy
9 years ago
Reply to  Tmckelv

The Wilson card is not mine. I just pulled it off eBay. I have only a very small card collectionn these days.

John Autin
Editor
9 years ago

Jack Sanford went 14-1 at Candlestick in 1962, and was 43-19, 3.16 there for his career.

nightfly
9 years ago

Those were the days… when your own baseball card could feature you being tagged out on the basepaths. Love this post.

Tmckelv
Tmckelv
9 years ago
Reply to  nightfly

The only reason I even knew Brohamer was running (and not the guy making the play) was because I eventually saw his name on his back. As a young child around 7 or so (when I first started to look at 1973 topps) I assumed the defender was the 2nd baseman Brohamer. But no, eventually I noticed. It is amazing how your eyes play tricks when you think you saw something at one point, you still see it that way many times after – even though the defender is obviously on the orioles and Brohamer’s name is on his jersey.

Andy R
Andy R
9 years ago

Great stuff, Andy! Yet another reason why this site is SO good…