Quiz – the Big Klu

Ted Kluszewski was among the most feared NL hitters of the early and mid 1950s. In his best 4-year run from 1953 to 1956, he compiled 148 OPS+ while batting .315 with 171 HR and 464 RBI, ranking, respectively, 4th, 3rd, 1st and 2nd in the NL for those categories. 

Interestingly, though, Ted is a member of two quite different groups of hitters. After the jump, you’ll see what I mean.

Congratulations to JoshG and John Autin! JoshG identified that Ted Kluszewski is one of just 8 hitters since 1946 with a season of 30 or more HR and fewer strikeouts than HR (Kluszewski had 4 such seasons; only DiMaggio had more, with 6, including 5 in a row in 1937-41). John Autin got the second part of the quiz, identifying that Kluszewski also (probably surprisingly) is one of just 12 hitters since 1946 with a season (min. 502 PA) of 10 or fewer HR and also 25 or fewer of both strikeouts and walks. Kluszewski had such a season in 1949. Glenn Beckert and Don Mueller lead the way, each with 3 such seasons.

So, here are the two lists. Each list represents all players who have achieved a particular season (min. 502 PA) accomplishment since 1946.

And, the second, very different, group of hitters.

So, the question is: What are those two season accomplishments? There’s nothing tricky here – the accomplishments are based only on simple counting stats.

Leave a Reply

35 Comments on "Quiz – the Big Klu"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Richard Chester
Guest

I think the first one is having a season with more strikeouts than home runs.

JoshG
Guest

List 1 is seasons with at least 30 home runs and more home runs than strikeouts. Kluszewski has four seasons like this, Berra and Mize each have two.

Ted B.
Guest

the second list is more triples than hrs

John Autin
Editor

I’m stumped, as usual. Second list also has a lot of low-K guys, but Ozzie & F.Alou don’t totally fit that mold.

They don’t share a birthday or a home town or a school.

nightfly
Guest

The second list is a lot of banjo hitters racking up qualifying seasons with barely any power, walks, or strikeouts… just putting it in play, over and over. It might have something to do with the 40 bb, 40 k, and <100 OPS+. Just guessing though.

John Autin
Editor

(using Nightfly’s inspiration) Qualifying season of less than 10 HRs and less than 25 in both walks & strikeouts?

nightfly
Guest

I think that’s it, JA. And remarkably, a few of the players also led the league in a hitting stat – Tim Foli led the league in HBP when he did it, and Don Mueller led the league in base hits that same season, which is enough of a reason to give him the nickname “Mandrake the Magician.”

(Does Mueller get onto the Monster Nickname team that way, too?)

Darien
Guest

I think he’d have to be the manager. Mandrake the Magician, commanding his team of monsters.

Richard Chester
Guest

First list: More HRs than SO, 30 or more HRs and fewer than 30 doubles. .

Richard Chester
Guest

Hey, I submitted that post before I realized that the quiz was solved. My answer wasn’t too far off, only Musial had more than 30 doubles.

PP
Guest

in #1 Musial was close in many other seasons: 36-38, 35-39, 33-39, 30-32, 29-34…

696 SOs in 12717 PAs, unbelievable

although Yogi had a 28-12 year (a non MVP year)

Ed
Guest

A spin-off of List 1 – 40 or more homeruns, 40 or fewer Ks. That list includes Klu, Mize, Ott, DiMaggio and Gehrig. Klu’s 1955 season was the most recent one.

Lawrence Azrin
Guest

No one has commented yet on the most interesting aspect of this card – Klu cut off the sleeves of his short-sleeved jersey, to display his enormous forearms. Would that even be allowed by the MLB rules today?

He must have been quite a site at bat.

Richard Chester
Guest
I think it would be more correct to say that that he wanted to display his upper arms and shoulders. I was under the impression that he wanted to show off and I was ready to jokingly remark that his surge in power after the 1953 season could have been due to the cut sleeves. I did some research on him and it was stated that the sleeves were preventing his muscles from bulging properly and it affected his swing. Supposedly that’s why he cut his sleeves. It would be nice to know exactly when he cut them. The card… Read more »
Lawrence Azrin
Guest

Richard,

Yes, your first sentence in #31 is more accurate; his forearms would already be visible even with conventional short sleeeves. Like you, I thought he cut his sleeves more for show than for practical reasons.

His back troubles in the late 50s may have prevented him from becoming one of all-time great hitters. Then again, you could say that about a number of other players with chronic injuries, such as Don Mattingly or Tony Oliva.

PP
Guest

As an aside, I like to check out the towns these guys are from: Argo, IL is now called Summit which apparently was the setting for Hemingway’s story The Killers…

PP
Guest

published 3 yrs after Klu was born

wpDiscuz