Carlos Beltran is Señor Octubre

These are Carlos Beltran‘s career postseason stats, through game 2 of this NLCS:

G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB
30 137 111 38 42 9 0 14 25 9 0 24 15 .378 .489 .838 1.327 93 1 1 0 1 1

You’ve seen those numbers before. But let’s have a little fun and project them out to 150 games, roughly a full year for an every-day player:

G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB
150 685 555 190 210 45 0 70 125 45 0 120 75 .378 .489 .838 1.327 465 5 5 0 5 5

As a season line, that would set a few MLB records

  • 190 Runs (modern record)
  • 465 Total Bases
  • 45 Stolen Bases without being caught

Projected to 162 games:

G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB
162 740 599 205 227 49 0 76 135 49 0 130 81 .378 .489 .838 1.327 502 5 5 0 5 5

You may have recognized a couple more records in that line:

  • 76 HRs
  • 125 Extra-Base Hits

Alas, it takes a rare combination of skill and good fortune to get into 150+ postseason games. But Beltran has made the most of his scattered opportunities. I hope we get to see him in a World Series before his time runs out.

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81 Comments on "Carlos Beltran is Señor Octubre"

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David
Guest

Mets could sure use a guy like that. Oh, right.

Doug
Guest

Amazing too how consistent he’s been – over 1.000 OPS in every series that he’s played 4+ games. Barring something unforeseen, this will be his 5th such series.

Even in the 3 games he played in the 2006 NLDS when he went only 2 for 9, he still had 5 walks for a .500 OBP.

Ed
Guest

Interestingly he’s only been intentionally walked once in his 137 postseason PAs. In the regular season, it’s once every 91 PAs. Perhaps managers are more reluctant to issue intentional walks in the postseason, even to someone with Beltran’s track record? On the other hand, his rate of “regular” walks is much, much higher in the postseason which could suggest that he’s being pitched around without directly being issued an intentional walk.

Evan
Guest

In 30 games he has 42 hits, 9 of which are doubles and 14 of which are HRs, yet he only has 25 RBI (one of which came on a SF) – he’s either not coming to bat with very many men on, not hitting very well when there are men on or being pitched around in these situations.

JDV
Guest

Those are unreal projections. 205 runs scored sticks out. His teammates sure have had some RBIs.

Larry
Guest

Beltran probably would have had better career stats and had more post season appearances if he had re-signed with the Astros in 2005. His time with the Mets came across rather lackluster and he might have thrived away from the glare of NYC. He certainly won’t be remembered for much of anything he did as a Met other than striking out. But if his career filled out to what he did in KC, Houston and St Louis, he’d be hall of fame bound.

Howard
Guest

From 2006 through the middle of 2009 when he was injured Beltran was one of the best players in baseball as a Met. He had a better career in NY than he did in KC.

bstar
Guest
In his time as a Met the only NL position players to have more WAR than Carlos Beltran are Albert Pujols and Chase Utley, not to mention the fact that Beltran missed almost 180 games in 2009-10. If Carlos Beltran is only going to be remembered for striking out in that time frame, sorry to say this but that’s on Mets fans for not appreciating a great player when he’s playing for your team. That’s certainly not the impression most fans have of Beltran. I can’t see how Beltran, with his incredible postseason performances, doesn’t end up in the Hall… Read more »
nightfly
Guest
This Met fan has no such limited memory, bstar. Beltran was the man. I always felt kind of sad that the Mets wasted the end of his prime years with Jerry freakin’ Manuel and his “bunt the guy from second to third with no outs in the first inning” offense; that they had a half-dozen second baseman at any one time, who combined might have been a passable player at the position; that they couldn’t get quite enough pitching for the rotation until the year after they dealt him (and hopefully Wheeler will justify that for the Mets); and worst,… Read more »
bstar
Guest

OK, good, nightfly, we’re thinking the same thing on this. I just don’t understand any narrative formed around one certain player making the last out of a particular season. Someone’s got to do it, right? Why turn him into a goat for that? To be honest, I’m not even aware of what exact at-bat we’re talking about although I do have a mental picture of Beltran buckling on a curveball.

JDGentile
Guest

2006 NLCS, Game 7, 9th inning, 2 outs, bases loaded, down 2 runs, 0-2 pitch… looking.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYN/NYN200610190.shtml

JDGentile
Guest

@75 None. I didn’t mean to suggest there was. I was just filling bstar in on “what exact at-bat we’re talking about” is all.

It was a daisy of a moment, though. Absolutely unforgettable. The image of that pitch will forever be etched in my mind like none other.

bstar
Guest

Thnx, JDG. Now I get why my memory fogs on that play. There was A LOT of non-baseball drama going on in my life in 2005-06. I don’t think I saw one game of the White Sox-Astros World Series in 2005.

JDGentile
Guest

99-02 is like that for me. Non-baseball drama is the worst kind of drama.

bstar
Guest

Ha, agree with that wholeheartedly. By the way, James, bstar = maddogisgod. 😉

JDGentile
Guest

Ha! I knew it!

I’ve always enjoyed our conversations, bstar. *Especially* the ones where we don’t see eye to eye. I was ‘JDanger’ Fangraphs, also. We ran into each other a few times there as well.

bstar
Guest

Ahhhhh, the erstwhile Mr. Danger reveals himself at last. 🙂

Please bug Mr. Appelmann about where the home/road career UZR splits went on Fangraphs.

MDIG was my Braves blog moniker. I need to change it.

Yes, I have enjoyed our arguments as well.

Jameson
Guest

Verlander is at 128 pitches and counting. What is his career high?

Jameson
Guest

Nevermind. Here’s Coke.

Nash Bruce
Guest

Jameson and Coke? 😉

DaveR
Guest

Okay, Cano singled. I think Ibanez flies out to medium right-center.

DaveR
Guest

Nibble nibble nibble. This ain’t NY, with the little right field, Coke!

RJ
Guest

There’s a saying in English soccer referring to the tense final stages of a season: “squeaky bum time”. This is that time.

Luis Gomez
Guest

Hey John, have you open your eyes yet?

Mike L
Guest

The sound of taps in playing in the background for the Yankee season. Oh well. John A, if it’s not going to be the Yankees or the O’s, go get ’em. Someone should get some pleasure out of this.

MikeD
Guest

I’ll be rooting for the Tigers too in their next step, yet I did a decent part of tonight’s game. I was flipping back and forth between the game and the debate, and at some point decided the debate was the more compelling of the two competitions!

MikeD
Guest

I did *miss* a decent part…

Oh for the addition of an edit button.

Mike L
Guest

Mike D,, there were more hits in the debate….

Mike Felber
Guest

Is Beltran’s great PS appearance clearly the result of skill, or luck? Can anyone know in so few PA?

Bryan O'Connor
Editor

In a way, it would be tragic if Beltran never played in the World Series. In another way, it would be a great lesson in the power of the team in baseball (and randomness and luck and all that) if the best postseason hitter ever retired without playing in a World Series.

Larry
Guest
Carlos Beltran played for the Mets from age 27 to 34. The very prime of just about any player’s career. It is hard to see how he could have had fewer post-season appearances if he signed with ANY other team that could have afforded his 120 million dollar price tag. He put up some good numbers. May in New York – but I don’t think elsewhere that fans looked upon him as the premier outfielder of his generation (although I think he is in the top three or four). He obviously had his heart set on playing in New York.… Read more »
Larry
Guest

I wonder if “He (Beltran) is very pro-active (concerning an injury)” is a euphemism for “He’s a pussy”.

Brooklyn Mick
Guest

Beltran’s had three seasons where he spent time on the DL: In 2000 he played in 98 games, in 2009 he played in 64, and in 2010 he played in 64. That averages out to exactly 81 games missed per season over the course of those three seasons.

In all other seasons (excluding 1998 when he was a September call-up), he’s averaged 151 games per season, including seasons of 162, 161, and 159. Not quite what I’d call a pussy.

Larry
Guest
John, I am going to make a statement which I think is true, but having followed the Astros forever, I might have lost track of baseball reality: “The vast majority of position players are older than 25”. That is either true or false. But I seem to recall that the Astros were the youngest team in baseball with an average age of around 25, so that is where I base my opinion on that statement. So, it seems to be contradictory and mutually exclusive to hold that a player’s prime is 25 to 29 and that the vast majority of… Read more »
Bells
Guest
The thing is, you can’t draw the conclusion that the majority of players are over 25 from the fact that the youngest team might have an average age of 25. It all depends on ‘average’. Usually this means ‘mean’. But you can’t really get much younger than 25 in baseball, maybe down to 20, but the Harpers of the world are rare. You can, however, have many players playing up until 35-40. That is 10-15 years over 25, but only 5 years under. So, let’s say you have a team of 10 players, 8 of whom are 23 and 2… Read more »
Larry
Guest
@ John and Bells – thanks for the replies – I am in agreement with your explanations. I had started by saying that the Mets signed Beltran from age 27 to 34 and that was the very prime of his career. John, I think I remember Bill James writing an essay in this way back when and that he clearly showed how players drop off after age 30. I should have recalled that. It is better to say that the Mets got Beltran at “the peak of his prime” age 27-29. Indeed, the 31-34 years were post-prime. So, 4 of… Read more »
Larry
Guest

(continued) while paying for past production where the player likely just got major league minimum while hoping the magic lasts until age 35 or beyond. Alas, for Albert and A-rod and many others, it seldom does.

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