Circle of Greats 1904 Part 1 Balloting

This post is for voting and discussion in the 85th round of balloting for the Circle of Greats (COG).  This round begins to add to the list of candidates eligible to receive your votes those players born in 1904. Rules and lists are after the jump.

Players born in 1904 are being brought on to the COG eligible list over two rounds, split in half based on last names — the top half by alphabetical order this round and the bottom half next round.  This round’s new group joins the holdovers from previous rounds to comprise the full set of players eligible to receive your votes this round.

The new group of 1904-born players, in order to join the eligible list, must, as usual, have played at least 10 seasons in the major leagues or generated at least 20 Wins Above Replacement (“WAR”, as calculated by baseball-reference.com, and for this purpose meaning 20 total WAR for everyday players and 20 pitching WAR for pitchers). This new group of 1904-born candidates joins the eligible holdovers from previous rounds to comprise the full list of players eligible to appear on your ballots.

Each submitted ballot, if it is to be counted, must include three and only three eligible players.  As always, the one player who appears on the most ballots cast in the round is inducted into the Circle of Greats.  Players who fail to win induction but appear on half or more of the ballots that are cast win four added future rounds of ballot eligibility.  Players who appear on 25% or more of the ballots cast, but less than 50%, earn two added future rounds of ballot eligibility.  Any other player in the top 9 (including ties) in ballot appearances, or who appears on at least 10% of the ballots, wins one additional round of ballot eligibility.

In total there were 17 players born in 1904 who met the “10 seasons played or 20 WAR” minimum requirement. Nine of those are being added to the eligible list this round (alphabetically from  Ethan Allen to Fred Frankhouse).  The eight players further down in the alphabet will be added next round.

All voting for this round closes at 11:59 PM EST Sunday, February 22, while changes to previously cast ballots are allowed until 11:59 PM EST Friday, February 20.

If you’d like to follow the vote tally, and/or check to make sure I’ve recorded your vote correctly, you can see my ballot-counting spreadsheet for this round here: COG 1904 Part 1 Vote Tally.  I’ll be updating the spreadsheet periodically with the latest votes.  Initially, there is a row in the spreadsheet for every voter who has cast a ballot in any of the past rounds, but new voters are entirely welcome — new voters will be added to the spreadsheet as their ballots are submitted.  Also initially, there is a column for each of the holdover candidates; additional player columns from the new born-in-1904 group will be added to the spreadsheet as votes are cast for them.

Choose your three players from the lists below of eligible players.  The fifteen current holdovers are listed in order of the number of future rounds (including this one) through which they are assured eligibility, and alphabetically when the future eligibility number is the same.  The 1904 birth-year guys are listed below in order of the number of seasons each played in the majors, and alphabetically among players with the same number of seasons played.

Holdovers:
Harmon Killebrew (eligibility guaranteed for 9 rounds)
Eddie Murray (eligibility guaranteed for 4 rounds)
Joe Cronin (eligibility guaranteed for 3 rounds)
Kevin Brown (eligibility guaranteed for 2 rounds)
Dennis Eckersley (eligibility guaranteed for 2 rounds)
Rick Reuschel (eligibility guaranteed for 2 rounds)
Luis Tiant (eligibility guaranteed for 2 rounds)
Richie Ashburn (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Roy Campanella  (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Dwight Evans (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Wes Ferrell (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Minnie Minoso (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Graig Nettles (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Red Ruffing (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)
Dave Winfield (eligibility guaranteed for this round only)

Everyday Players (born in 1904, ten or more seasons played in the major leagues or at least 20 WAR):
Spud Davis
Ethan Allen
Ripper Collins

Pitchers (born in 1904, ten or more seasons played in the major leagues or at least 20 WAR):
Pete Appleton
Johnny Allen
Fred Frankhouse
Boom-Boom Beck
Lloyd Brown
George Blaeholder

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Hartvig
Hartvig
7 years ago

The era of great nicknames continues unabated- Spud, Ripper, Gimpy and best of all Boom-Boom.

Cronin, Campanella, Ferrell

3 others on the bubble that I think might belong so I may revisit this list depending on how voting goes.

Voomo Zanzibar
Voomo Zanzibar
7 years ago
Reply to  Hartvig

Boom-Boom Beck
supposedly earned his nickname while pitching for Casey Stengel’s Dodgers in 1934. Becoming upset during a July 4th game when Stengel came out to remove him when the Dodgers still had a lead, Beck angrily threw the ball into right field at the old Baker Bowl in Philadelphia, PA.

The ball hit the tin-plated wall and caromed to center.
The “boom-boom” of the rebound roused hung-over centerfielder Hack Wilson, who was daydreaming during the pitching change and thought the game had resumed. Wilson pursued the ball and fired a strike back to the infield.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Voomo Zanzibar

Beck and Al Simmons have an interesting quirk about their careers.
– In Beck’s first career game, Simmons batted against him
– In Simmons’ last career game, twenty years later, he again batted against Beck

David Horwich
David Horwich
7 years ago
Reply to  Voomo Zanzibar

VZ @ 20 –

The Dodgers weren’t leading when Beck was removed; the Phillies were ahead 3-0 in the bottom of the 1st with 2 outs. Beck had allowed 3 runs on 3 hits and 3 walks & was removed with the bases loaded and the pitcher coming to bat.

Also, Wilson was playing RF, not CF, in that game.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/PHI/PHI193407042.shtml

Voomo Zanzibar
Voomo Zanzibar
7 years ago
Reply to  David Horwich

@38,
I copy/pasted that directly from Boom Boom’s bullpen page at b-r.

David Horwich
David Horwich
7 years ago
Reply to  Voomo Zanzibar

Well, that page has it wrong, evidently (presuming the box score is correct). I’ve not found the bullpen pages at bb-ref to be terribly reliable.

That page provides another version of the story, which is a little more specific and accurate. But that versiom claims Beck was traded to Philadelphia shortly after the July 4th game, which is incorrect, as he finished the year out with Brooklyn.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Voomo Zanzibar

Possibly, the alternate story meant that it was Wilson who went to the Phillies shortly afterwards, as that indeed did happen, though Hack was released and picked up, rather than traded.

Wilson played his final game later that 1934 season, getting a 2 RBI pinch-hit, the only searchable Phillie to end his career that way.

David Horwich
David Horwich
7 years ago
Reply to  Voomo Zanzibar

Doug @ 67 –

Indeed, you’re right, the second anecdote is referring to Wilson rather than Beck; I misread the last part of the excerpt.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
7 years ago
Reply to  David Horwich

According to the Charlton’s Chronology Wilson was in RF that day.

Steven
Steven
7 years ago

Minoso, Ashburn, Cronin

Darien
7 years ago

Killebrew, Cronin, and Eckersley

koma
koma
7 years ago

Harmon Killebrew, Dennis Eckersley, Minnie Minoso

Artie Z
Artie Z
7 years ago

Murray, Nettles, Ferrell

RonG
RonG
7 years ago

Campanella, Evans, Minoso

David P
David P
7 years ago

Cronin, Evans, Tiant

Owen
Owen
7 years ago

Campanella, Minoso, Brown

PaulE
PaulE
7 years ago

Killebrew, Murray, Winfield

David W
David W
7 years ago

Eddie Murray, Roy Campanella, Dave Winfield

Chris C
Chris C
7 years ago

Same as last round – Cronin, Eckersley, Murray.

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
7 years ago

I tried to vote earlier, but apparently it didn’t take. Whoops.

Anyway, I promised Joe Cronin a vote earlier. I think I met that requirement in the Redemption Round, but I’m going to go ahead and toss him another vote, because i’m just not sure how to separate the people we have left on the holdover list. So here goes nothin’:

Kevin Brown
Luis Tiant
Joe Cronin

latefortheparty
latefortheparty
7 years ago

Joe Cronin
Graig Nettles
Rick Reuschel

Voomo Zanzibar
Voomo Zanzibar
7 years ago

I know it was the early 30’s, but wow, a Catcher who batted .327 over a seven 7 stretch! That would be Spud.

He batted .280 in his partial first year.
That’s .324 over his first 8.

Since 1893, Catchers BA in their first 8 years (minimum 2000 PA):

.328 … Mike Piazza
.324 … Spud Davis
.323 … Joe Mauer
.321 … Mickey Cochrane
.319 … Ernie Lombardi
.316 … Bill Dickey
.305 … Johnny Bassler
.304 … Manny Sanguillen
.304 … Jason Kendall

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago

Here’s a little trivia question for you while I consider who to vote for:

Which player is the all-time American League career leader in home runs while playing third base?

No–it is NOT A-ROD.

Indeed, it’s a player who played before the steroids era: Graig Nettles.

I’m not going to sit around now and run the numbers, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s the only (non-steroid era) career league leader for HRs at a particular position that we haven’t voted into the COG.

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago
Reply to  Joseph

Conclusion: He is worthy of your consideration at the very least.

ReliefMan
ReliefMan
7 years ago
Reply to  Joseph

Wes Ferrell is tied for the AL lead (and holds the MLB lead outright) for home runs as a pitcher; obviously all of those guys are going to predate the steroid era. In fact, new holdover Red Ruffing is only one behind him in AL (2 behind in MLB).

Clearly those numbers offer such a shining indicator of their pitching value.

Doug
Editor
7 years ago
Reply to  Joseph

Here are those career HR leaders by position, thru 2014 and thru 1995. I’ve credited a player with a HR at a position if he played at that position in games with a home run (thus, some HR may be double-counted and some pinch-hit home runs may be counted for a subsequent position).
HR Leaders by Position
Note: counting his whole career (thru 1997), Sandberg (277) edges Morgan and Hornsby for pre-PEDs HR by a second baseman.

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

My compliments on this great little spreadsheet.

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

Poor guy–his MLB time was sandwiched between two HOF first basemen–probably why he spent so much time in the minors.

Voomo Zanzibar
Voomo Zanzibar
7 years ago

Winning Percentage leaders,
First 6 years of a career
Minimum 1000 IP

.739 … Johnny Allen
.734 … Whitey Ford
.719 … Dwight Gooden
.705 … Vic Raschi
.702 … Tim Hudson
.700 … Don Newcombe

Gary Bateman
Gary Bateman
7 years ago

Minoso, Ashburn, Ruffing

Mo
Mo
7 years ago

Ashburn Reuschel Cronin

Andy
Andy
7 years ago

Killer, Campy, Kevin Brown

Doug
Editor
7 years ago

This year’s tidbits. 1. Pete Appleton retired after the 1945 season as the oldest live ball era pitcher to post a 135 or better ERA+ in his only 200 IP season, accomplishing that feat in 1936 at age 32. Who holds that record today? 2. Johnny Allen’s 15 consecutive wins in 1937 remains the record for starting pitchers to begin a season. Who is the only pitcher since to equal that mark? 3. Fred Frankhouse’s 230.2 IP in 1935 were then the most by a Braves pitcher in a live ball era season with ERA+ below 80. Who holds that… Read more »

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

1. Can you clarify this? I see Jack Quinn with 211 IP and ERA+ of 138 in 1928. Isn’t that live ball era?

Joseph
Joseph
7 years ago
Reply to  Joseph

I meant to also say that he was 44.

Doug
Editor
7 years ago
Reply to  Joseph

That wasn’t Quinn’s only 200 IP season.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

2. Johnny Allen question: Dave McNally

Doug
Doug
7 years ago

McNally started the 1969 season with a 15-0 record, reaching that mark on July 30 by which time he had already logged 171 IP. McNally was only 5-7 the rest of the way, though he still averaged 7 IP over the last 14 of his 40 starts.

Two seasons later, McNally was one of four 20-game winners (the others were Jim Palmer, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson) for the three-peat AL champion Orioles. Only the 1920 White Sox also had four pitchers win 20 games.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

5. Boom-Boom Beck question: Wilbur Wood.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

It was Wood, in 1973, the third of five consecutive seasons with over 40 starts. His 20 losses were second to the 21 setbacks for teammate Stan Bahnsen, who also had over 40 starts that season (and the one before).

Wood saw his ERA climb each year of those five seasons, going 1.91, 2.51, 3.46, 3.60 and 4.11, while averaging 336 IP.

Steven
Steven
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Ripper Collins question: Bill White.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Steven

White is the answer.

If not for the 1981 strike, Keith Hernandez would have had four consecutive (1979-82) 4.5 WAR seasons. As it was, he almost did it with 4.2 WAR in 1981. Hernandez also had three consecutive 4.5 WAR seasons (1984-86) for the Mets.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Doug,

Re: 1. Pete Appleton question.

I could have overlooked someone, but I thought I found every pitching season since 1946 with ERA+ 135 and over/ IP 200 and over / age 33 and older, and each was by a pitcher with more than one season of 200 or more IP. Could the answer be a pitcher also aged 32, albeit several weeks older at the end of his age 32 season than Appleton was at the end of his? If so, my guess is Hisashi Iwakuma.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

You did overlook someone.

He pitched for over twenty years, but only one in which he was primarily a starter. Led the league in ERA that year.

Hartvig
Hartvig
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Is it Hoyt Wilhelm?

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Hartvig

Wilhelm is correct. He posted a league best 2.19 ERA (173 ERA+) in 226 IP in 1959 at age 36.

Wilhelm also led the league in ERA (and W-L%) in his 1952 rookie season with 159.1 IP, still the most innings in a zero start rookie season.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Apparently I blew right past him when combing through my search results. When I checked again, there was Wilhelm’s name plain as day. Looking at his stats that year leaves me wondering how ERA+ compares as an indicator of a pitcher’s performance versus other advanced statistics. Kershaw is the only qualifier the last two years with an ERA+ higher than Wilhelm’s 173 in 1959. I realize we’re comparing across eras, and having an era that much lower than league average as Wilhelm’s 2.19 was in 1959 is impressive. But his other stats just look to me like he had a… Read more »

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

Those who remember seeing Wilhelm pitch have cautioned against relying only on ERA in evaluating him, suggesting RA should also be considered since Wilhelm, like many knuckleballers, often didn’t know where his pitches would end up (and neither did his catchers). Indeed, looking at Wilhelm’s 1959 season, 9 of his 64 runs allowed (14%) were unearned, high for most pitchers but actually a good number for Wilhelm who was north of 18% for his career. His 5 wild pitches doesn’t seem like a lot, but is probably understated because many more were probably swung at. I don’t know if there’s… Read more »

Artie Z.
Artie Z.
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

On the other hand – Wilhelm was just really, really good in 1959, his one full year as a starter. He’s basically tied with Pascual as the best pitcher in the AL (7.8 to 7.6 WAR in Pascual’s favor). Every other pitcher is under 5 – Pascual was much better with the bat so he leads Wilhelm 8.6 to 6.8 in total WAR, but Wilhelm is basically tied with Mantle (6.6 WAR), which means he did OK. Even if all of his runs against him were earned – he still leads the NL in ERA (2.54 to Pascual’s 2.64). And… Read more »

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

Thanks for your insights, Doug and Artie Z. Work has kept me away for several days since I posted my question – I even missed the deadline for voting on the 1904 Part 1 ballot. :o(

Your responses give me a few more ideas to consider when evaluating players. That’s one thing I really appreciate about this site: there’s always more to learn from reading each other’s posts.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

3. Fred Frankhouse question: Johnny Sain w/ 243.0 IP and 79 ERA+ in 1949.

Doug
Editor
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

Sain is correct.

Quite a drop-off (70 points) in ERA+ from the year before when he and Warren Spahn led the Braves to the pennant.

Spahn actually had only an okay season in ’48, with a 15-12 record and 105 ERA+. He improved to his “usual” 21 wins in ’49, the second of 8 times Spahn would win exactly 21 games.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

One more: 4. Lloyd Brown question: Jim Perry.

Also, Iwakuma is the only pitcher I can find as a possible answer to the Pete Appleton question.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

Perry is correct. His five seasons came in a 7-year period (1963-69), the last three consecutively.

Perry was a 20-game winner in 1969. Only Wayne Garland in 1976 has since won 20 games while also pitching 10 games in relief. Both of them needed those relief appearances to win 20, as Perry was 3-0 in 10 relief outings and Garland was 4-0 in 13.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

6. George Blaeholder question: Brian Moehler

Doug
Doug
7 years ago

Moehler, who last pitched in 2010, is just the fourth pitcher since 1893 (and first since Blaeholder retired in 1936) with career H/9 over 10.4 in 250+ starts. Those two join Clarence Mitchell (1911-32) and Win Mercer (1894-1902). Of the four, only Moehler (12.3) was under 20 WAR. Mercer was an interesting, and tragic, character. After four rough campaigns, Mercer regained his form in 1902 in his first season in Detroit, recording a career best ERA, pitching a one-hitter and two-hitter, and finishing second in the AL with four shutouts. The Tigers announced that Mercer would also be the team’s… Read more »

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

8. Ethan Allen question: while b-ref still considers Manny Ramirez active, I’m guessing the answer we’re looking for is Victor Martinez.

Doug
Doug
7 years ago
Reply to  Scary Tuna

Yes, V-Mart is the one.

I was surprised there was nobody else.

Scary Tuna
Scary Tuna
7 years ago
Reply to  Doug

Me, too. Matt Holliday met the criteria before his 2014 season brought his age 30+ BA below .300.

A few players might join the list in a couple years, with Cabrera and Cano seeming to be the best bets. After Mauer’s down year, his average sits at exactly .300 for his age 30 and 31 campaigns. While he could bounce back, I guess you could say that about many a player whose performance dips in his early 30s. Three years ago, Albert Pujols looked to have a decent chance of joining this group.

Stephen
Stephen
7 years ago

Killebrew, Cronin, Ashburn

Shard
Shard
7 years ago

Richie Ashburn – Eddie Murray – Wes Ferrell

Andy
Andy
7 years ago

Cronin, Kevin Brown, Murray

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
7 years ago

Cronin, Murray, Minoso

Andy: I have not had a Recent Comment listing in almost 24 hours. I found out about the 1904 balloting via a message on Facebook. I then went to HHS and entered 1904 balloting in the searchbox and it came up.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
7 years ago

Spud Davis question: Smoky Burgess

Doug
Editor
7 years ago

Burgess, with three 400 PA seasons, is correct. He did, though, have seasons of 399 and 392 PA.

JamesS
JamesS
7 years ago

I have been voting for Alomar for so long I feel lost.
Murray, Campanella, Tiant

T-Bone
T-Bone
7 years ago

Reuschel, Cronin, Ferrell

opal611
opal611
7 years ago

For the 1904-Part 1 election, I’m voting for:
-Dave Winfield
-Eddie Murray
-Dennis Eckersley

Other top candidates I considered highly (and/or will consider in future rounds):
-Cronin
-Killebrew
-Brown
-Reuschel
-Tiant
-Evans
-Nettles
-Ashburn

Bill Johnson
Bill Johnson
7 years ago

Killebrew, Eckersley, and Ashburn

Hub Kid
Hub Kid
7 years ago

Cronin, Tiant, Evans

I go with Tiant as the best of the ‘Missed by the HOF pitchers’ that seem to be the heart of the COG pitcher deadlock: 4 years as Cy Young contender (and a good case for best AL pitcher outright in 1968); curious ‘dual peak’ career (‘young peak’ in Cleveland, ‘veteran peak’ in Boston), with a real ‘trough’ in between the two, and a long fade after the Boston years.

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
7 years ago
Reply to  Hub Kid

@51,

Tiant was traded to the Twins after the 1969 season, went on the DL in the middle of the 1970 season, was released by the Twins during spring training in 1971. Picked up shortly afterwards by the Red Sox, in 1971 he struggled between the Sox and AAA. However, in 1972, he re-invented himself as the pitcher who threw from a hundred different angles, and as you said, began his second very successful part of his career.

JEV
JEV
7 years ago

Killebrew, Campanella, Murray

brp
brp
7 years ago

Ashburn
Nettles
Winfield

brp
brp
7 years ago
Reply to  brp

***** VOTE CHANGE *****

Murray
Ashburn
Winfield

***** VOTE CHANGE *****

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
7 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

I second that! Sometimes, I do a quick Ctrl+F for the word “change” just to make sure, but yeah; I mostly just check the bottom of the thread, too. So please post changes down there! Thanks!

dr. remulak
dr. remulak
7 years ago

Nettles, Cronin, Campanella.

The Diamond King
7 years ago

Murray, Eckersley, Evans

Luis Gomez
Luis Gomez
7 years ago

Miñoso, Tiant, Winfield.

Most baseball fans know that Dave Winfield was drafted in three different sports. My question is, does anyone knows in which round was he elected in the NBA, ABA and NFL drafts?

Paul E
Paul E
7 years ago
Reply to  Luis Gomez

Luis G:
As far as I can tell, Winfield was drafted:

4th pick overall – San Diego Padres
79th pick overall – Atlanta Hawks
17th round – Minnesota Vikings (as a TE)
No idea where in the A B A draft (by the Utah Stars)

Voomo Zanzibar
Voomo Zanzibar
7 years ago
Reply to  Luis Gomez

Dave!
1st Round MLB Padres (the College WS MVP (as a Pitcher)) .
5th Round NBA Atlanta Hawks
17th Round NFL Vikings

“I wanted to play the outfield and be in the lineup every day,” Winfield says. “Had I been drafted by a team looking to me [as a pitcher], I might have considered basketball. Football was never really an option to me, but [the Vikings] looked at me as a tight end.”

David Horwich
David Horwich
7 years ago
Reply to  Luis Gomez

According to his SABR bio, Winfield was drafted in the 4th round of the ABA draft.

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/98b82e8f

Doug
Doug
7 years ago

Cronin, Tiant, Nettles

Brent
Brent
7 years ago

cronin, killer, tiant

Kirk
Kirk
7 years ago

Minoso, Killebrew, and Dw Evans

BillH
BillH
7 years ago

Murray, Winfield, Nettles

Mike G.
Mike G.
7 years ago

Brown, Cronin, Ruffing

PP
PP
7 years ago

Killer, Murray, Dewey

PP
PP
7 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

Would like to see both get in. I think they’re deserving. It’s close between the two, as a previous discussion showed. Dewey’s an old fave, though COG might be a stretch for him. (Didn’t know Briles died a few years ago.)

Steve
Steve
7 years ago

Red Ruffing, Harmon Killebrew; and Joe Cronin George had it right Winfield was Mr. May and deserves a spot not

mosc
mosc
7 years ago

I don’t think we’ve discussed it recently on here and it tends to get lost in discussions about -91 RFIELD for a 7 time gold glover. I give Winfield full credit for 1989. He was old, but 1988 was one of his best years. He could still hit when he got to california in 1990 too.

J.R.
J.R.
7 years ago

Killebrew, Campanella, Winfield

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
7 years ago

Through 38 votes (J.R. @82), here are your leaders: 19 – Joe Cronin 12 – Harmon Killebrew, Eddie Murray 10 – Roy Campanella ==================25% (9.5) 8 – Minnie Minoso 7 – Richie Ashburn, Graig Nettles, Luis Tiant, Dave Winfield 5 – Kevin Brown, Dennis Eckersley, Dwight Evans 4 – Wes Ferrell, Rick Reuschel ==================10% (3.8) 2 – Red Ruffing Cronin’s pulling away, but even if he does have the legs to win it, extra rounds of eligibility are a must-have for a number of our candidates, facing the gauntlet of 1903 (Cochrane, Gehrig, Gehringer, Hubbell, Waner), and 1902 (Simmons). 1901… Read more »

David Horwich
David Horwich
7 years ago
Reply to  Dr. Doom

Dr D, I think you’ve miscounted; I’ve double-checked my tally, which agrees with birtelcom’s:

18 Cronin
13 Murray
12 Killebrew
==================25%
9 Campanella
8 Minoso
7 Ashburn, Tiant, Winfield
6 Eckersley, Evans, Nettles
5 Brown
4 Ferrell
==================10%
3 Reuschel, Ruffing

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
7 years ago
Reply to  David Horwich

For some reason, my spreadsheet was counting dr. remulak’s vote twice, and The Diamond King’s not at all. I don’t really understand what happened. The data entry was correct; I just wasn’t getting the right total. Thus it is proved: never trust computers.

My tally now matches yours and birtelcom’s. I’ve updated through Jeff B below.

birtelcom
birtelcom
7 years ago
Reply to  Dr. Doom

Strange things happen — thus it is excellent that we have multiple tallies going.

Jeff B
Jeff B
7 years ago

Murray, Killebrew and Winfield

Dr. Doom
Dr. Doom
7 years ago

Through Jeff B @87, the 39th vote:

18 – Joe Cronin
14 – Eddie Murray
13 – Harmon Killebrew
==================25% (10)
9 – Roy Campanella
8 – Minnie Minoso, Dave Winfield
7 – Richie Ashburn, Luis Tiant
6 – Dennis Eckersley, Dwight Evans, Graig Nettles
5 – Kevin Brown
4 – Wes Ferrell
==================10% (4)
3 – Rick Reuschel, Red Ruffing

bstar
bstar
7 years ago

Cronin, Murray, Eckersley

Josh
Josh
7 years ago

Joe Cronin, Red Ruffing, Dave Winfield.