Don Baylor 1949-2017

Don Baylor, longtime AL player and later an NL manager, has passed away at the age of 68. Baylor played over 2000 games, all in the AL, in a career spanning 19 years that included an MVP selection in 1979 and appearances in 7 post-seasons and 3 World Series. After his playing days, Baylor was the first manager of the expansion Colorado Rockies, guiding them to a post-season appearance in only their third season. More on Baylor after the jump.

After cups of coffee in 1970 and 1971, Baylor joined the powerhouse Orioles to stay in 1972, becoming their regular left-fielder for the following three seasons. In his time in Baltimore, Baylor posted a solid 125 OPS+ while twice leading the junior circuit in HPB, a talent he would perfect later in his career. Baylor’s power game blossomed with 25 bombs in his last season on the Chesapeake, becoming the first Brown or Oriole in more than 50 years with a season of 25 home runs and 25 stolen bases.

With Charlie Finley following Connie Mack in the A’s tradition of housecleaning after a run of championship seasons, Baltimore offered up Baylor to pry prize catch Reggie Jackson from Oakland in a package deal that also saw pitchers Mike Torrez and Ken Holtzman swap teams. Baylor and Jackson would both play just one season for their new teams (Jackson followed Baylor with a 25 HR, 25 SB campaign that has yet to be matched by another Oriole) before both hit the free agent market and made good in extended stays with their new clubs.

For Baylor, greener pastures lay in Anaheim where he turned in a career best 5.2 oWAR in his 1979 MVP season, leading the junior circuit in Runs (120) and RBI (139) while belting 36 home runs and 33 doubles. That was the first 120 run/120 RBI season by an Angel, a feat matched since only by Vladimir Guerrero in 2004. Baylor’s heroics in 1979 helped the Angels to their first post-season appearance, falling to the Orioles in the ALCS. Three years later, Reggie Jackson swapped coasts to join Baylor as a free agent signee in Anaheim; together, they helped a veteran Angel ballclub to its second post-season appearance (unfortunately a painful one as they dropped three straight in Milwaukee, after taking a 2-0 ALCS lead at home).

In his 6 years in Anaheim, Baylor split time between the outfield and DH in the first four seasons before becoming an everyday DH in the final two campaigns. Baylor’s glove was a liability for any team, so the move to being a full-time DH was certainly overdue. Following the 1982 season, Baylor signed as a free agent with the Yankees where he turned in three solid, if unspectacular, seasons as the everyday DH, posting 20 HR and 80 RBI each time. More than 30 years later, Baylor remains the only Yankee DH to post those totals more than once.

Following the 1985 season, New York dealt the 36 year-old Baylor to the Red Sox for Mike Easler. In his last big season, Baylor’s 31 home runs and 94 RBI helped the Red Sox to the 1986 AL pennant, before falling in the World Series in 7 games (as Boston had also done in 1946, 1967 and 1975). The next year, Boston dealt Baylor in a deadline deal to the Twins who went on to that franchise’s first World Series title in more than 60 years. Down 5-3 in the game and trailing 3-2 in the series, Baylor’s two run homer tied game 6 as the upstart Minnesotans came back from the brink to best the Cardinals. For his final season, Baylor returned to Oakland (following Reggie’s farewell campaign there the year before) and again saw action in the World Series. Quiz: which other player appeared in three consecutive World Series for three different teams?

Baylor’s career totals include more than 2000 hits, 1200 runs, 1200 RBI, 300 home runs and 300 doubles. He recorded 200 hits, 100 runs and 100 RBI for five different teams, and saw post-season action for each of those franchises. Baylor posted 0.750 career OPS in both the LCS and World Series, one of 20 players to do so in 10+ games in each of those playoff rounds. Among players with more than half their career games at DH, Baylor ranks 4th in Games, Runs, HR and RBI, and 5th in Hits and WAR. Baylor led the AL in HPB on eight different occasions; his career total of 267 is an AL record, and ranks second only to Craig Biggio‘s MLB mark of 285.

For those looking for a more challenging Baylor quiz, try this one under the Player Stats Quiz pages of the site.

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65 Comments on "Don Baylor 1949-2017"

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Jeff Harris
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Can we talk about that terrible 1979 MVP voting….?

Doug
Guest

Of course. Who do you think would have been a better choice?

Lynn and Brett certainly seemed to have superior seasons to Baylor. Think those two would have been my top two picks. Nobody knew it then but Baylor was 11th in oWAR and 25th in WAR.

David P
Guest

That was a bad year all around for award winners. Mike Flannagan won the AL Cy Young even though he wasn’t in the top ten in AL pitching WAR. Stargell and his 2.5 WAR tied with Keith Hernandez (a decent selection) for the NL MVP. Sutter wasn’t a terribe choice for NL Cy Young but he was behind Niekro, Reuschel, and J.R Richard in WAR.

Mike L
Guest

It wasn’t a totally irrational choice, using the criteria people did in that day. Baylor led the league in both runs scored and RBI, when RBI was considered an important stat. The Angels made it to the post season, and Baylor’s July .349/.409/.735 11HR/34 RBI helped prop them up.

no statistician but
Guest
Mike L: I don’t think you mean exactly what you wrote about RBIs, or were you possibly being ironic? Let me pose the subject in a question: how important are RBIs? Well, to a team that has trouble moving runners across the plate, they’re very important. Runner on third and nobody out? What baseball person, statistically inclined or otherwise, wouldn’t say that if he’s stranded there by the next three batters, there’s been an RBI failure? Being wise isn’t being cynical. We all are aware by now that RBIs are related to having runners in scoring position, but anyone who… Read more »
Mike L
Guest
I wasn’t trying for irony, but maybe I could have been more precise in my language. I do think RBI are important, but I think that 40 years ago they were considered even more important. . And I’m on the older side, so I can recall when an RBI-guy was considered really important–Tony Perez, Joe Carter. I took a quick look at the AL MVP votes, and from 1967 to 2016, in 41 of those 50 years, the MVP had 100+ RBI. Five other seasons pitchers won. And anecdotally, Baylor’s first two months he had 51 RBI in 51 games–it… Read more »
e pluribus munu
Guest

nsb, I think Mike is trying to distinguish between a decision that’s wrong and one that’s irrational. Stargell’s award in the NL in ’79 was irrational, based on sentiment and, undoubtedly, postseason drama. Baylor’s award was rational but wrong, because RBIs are not a very good indicator of value, as we now agree. But rational people didn’t agree that was true then (as I’m sure you remember as clearly as anyone here, of a certain age).

howard
Guest

MVP voting takes place before the post-season. Was it different in 1979?

e pluribus munu
Guest
My error, howard. I thought the voting took place later, but was not supposed to take the post-season into consideration. I see that you are not only correct for the present time, but that this has always been the case. I remembered that the discussion at the time of Stargell’s award included talk of his postseason heroics, and must have mistakenly connected that with the odd nature of the vote. The other factors I recall were Stargell’s several earlier MVP near misses, and his clubhouse role in ’79, which connected his promotion of the team’s “We Are Family” theme song… Read more »
David P
Guest

PA with RISP:

Baylor: 258
Brett: 211
Lynn: 166

Triple Slash with RISP:

Baylor: .330/.395/.586
Brett: .343/.424/.618
Lynn: .348/.440/.748

Baylor was quite good with RISP. But he was a little worse than Brett and a lot worse than Lynn. But he drove in more runs than them because he had more opportunities.

Richard Chester
Guest

For people like me who like to pay attention to RBIs, I have calculated % of runners driven in (RDI) after I remove all PA in which a player receives a walk with runners on base except for the bases loaded situation. I did it for all AL players with 107+ RBI.

ROB……….RDI……..%RDI……….HR…………Player
326…………83……….25.5………..39………….Fred Lynn
401…………92……….22.9………..20………….Darrell Porter
374………….84………22.5………..23………….George Brett
471………..103………21.9………..36………….Don Baylor
359………….76………21.1………..35………….Ken Singleton
439………….91………20.7………..39………….Jim Rice
405………….78………19.3………..45………….Gorman Thomas

Interesting contrast between Lynn and Rice. Lynn batted third in 1979 and Rice batted fourth.

Mike L
Guest

Rice had the more “feared” RBI. Seriously, I always thought Lynn the more gifted player, but he had trouble staying healthy.

David P
Guest

Kirby Puckett: 7831 PAs, triple slash .318/.360/.477, 50.9 WAR, 37.5 WAA, 10 All-star games
Fred Lynn: 7923 PAs, triple slash: .283/.360/.484. 50.0 WAR, 38.2 WAA, 9 All-star games

Puckett made the HOF on his first ballot. Lynn fell of on his second. But really what’s the differene? Higher batting average? More consistency? Puckett being given extra credit because of his eye injury?

Granted most people don’t believe that Puckett should be in the HOF. But I don’t see how one can be included and not the other. This is why the HOF will never make sense in my opinion.

Mike L
Guest

No question in my mind that Puckett’s cause was aided by the abrupt end of his career. But in some respects, you can see why he would have had a leg up on Lynn–Lynn declined through the second half of his career. Puckett was still very effective at the time he was forcibly retired. His last season: .314/.370/.559, OPS+ of 130, 3.6 bWAR. It’s not unreasonable to think he could have had three more good quality seasons. Empirically, Lynn’s cumulative stats are not Hall-worthy–a good but not great player.

Mike L
Guest

Doug, I’m curious as to your take on something. From 2005 through 2010 Albert had never less than 92 BB in any season. He dropped to 61 in his age 31 season, and has never been above 52 since then.
What do you attribute that to, and are there any players of anywhere near his magnitude with similarities at that age?

Doug
Guest
For 2011, the league was probably responding to the big season that Matt Holliday had the year before hitting behind Pujols. With someone almost as dangerous hitting behind him, Pujols was bound to get better pitches. Before Holliday joined the Cards late in 2009, Ryan Ludwick was hitting behind Pujols. Ludwick was a decent player, but not in the same class as Holliday. In LA, part of it is having Mike Trout hitting ahead of him. If you’re being careful with Trout, you can’t be quite so careful with the next guy; ergo, you’ve got to try to get somebody… Read more »
Mike L
Guest

The lowest walk rate after 30 of the entire group is stunning. He’s starting to look like a slightly better version of a late career Ruben Sierra

no statistician but
Guest
The problem with picking a replacement here is a common one, but I ‘ll weigh in on the side of the writers to an extent: Baylor led the league in both runs and runs batted in and also in runs accounted for after subtracting home runs. He did it for a division leader. Lynn and Brett had great seasons, nearly identical in terms of traditional statistics, and yet their team finished third in the east, 11 games back. Brett and Porter had excellent seasons for the Royals, but the Royals lost out to the Angels in the division. It was… Read more »
e pluribus munu
Guest
What really struck me about this vote when I revisited it was the scale of Baylor’s dominance: 71% of first-place ballots, when the top five contenders have offensive records that – to the eye fixed on traditional metrics – closely resemble one another (Brett a little less than the others). Baylor was, of course, on a division winner, but so was Singleton, and Boston’s W-L record was superior to the Angels’ at a time when the schedule was “balanced,” meaning that W-L records weren’t impacted by divisional strength. For that matter, Brett’s KC team was just behind California. It’s not… Read more »
alz9794
Guest
If we look at things from a historical perspective, in 1977 the Angels finished 74-88, in 5th place. Baylor had zero MVP love. In 1978 the Angels finished 87-75, in 2nd place. It was their highest finish and winning percentage in their history up to that point in time. Baylor got a little love, with his .255 AVG., 34 HRs, and 99 RBI. In 1979, the Angels win their first ever division title. Baylor jumps to .296, 36, 139. Baylor, more than any of the other players mentioned (Singleton, Brett, Lynn, Rice) really had not had a season like the… Read more »
alz9794
Guest

I should say the list of players who led their league in runs scored and RBI is from 1930-1978. I know MVP voting had some quirks to it earlier than 1930.

Bryan O\'Connor
Guest

Eric Hinske played for the 2007 Red Sox, 2008 Rays, and 2009 Yankees.

Doug
Guest

Got it. Hinske was a pinch-runner for the Red Sox and pinch-hitter for the Rays and Yankees, for a grand total of 4 World Series PA. He made the post-season for a fourth straight year in 2010 while playing for, yes, a fourth different team (the Braves).

Hinske’s two pinch home runs in the post-season is tied with four others for the most ever. Only Hinske hit both in a losing cause (for the game).

Joey59
Guest

Hinske had a pinch-hit appearance in the ’07 Series for the Sox against Colorado. He pinch-hit for, of all people, David Ortiz.

The score was 13-1 Sox at the time of his appearance though.

David P
Guest

Don Baylor was on both the ’95 and ’96 HOF ballots. But I’m not sure why. He received only 2.6% of the vote. Also carrying over from ’95 to ’96 were Vida Blue (3.1%) and George Foster (3.5%). Meanwhie, Ted Simmons (3.7%) was one and done.

Was there some sort of special disposition for past MVP winners? I’ve never heard of such a thing but that’s the only thing I can think of that ties Baylor, Blue, and Foster together, while excluding Simmons.

alz9794
Guest
Pure speculation on my part, but this time period was the time period of Pete Rose’s initial HOF case. I believe all of Rose’s votes were write-in votes, so perhaps voters wrote in Baylor, Blue, and Foster? Neither Foster nor Baylor received 5% in 1995, so both were “dropped” from the ballot. Blue, on the other hand, received 5.7% in 1995, more than Lolich, Guidry, and Staub. However, Blue doesn’t show up anywhere on the 1996 ballot, while Lolich, Guidry, and Staub do. Even the players with 0 votes in 1996 (Johnny Ray, Claudell Washington, Bob Knepper, and Jeffrey Leonard)… Read more »
David P
Guest

Yeah, Blue falling off after receiving 5.7% of the vote makes no sense at all.

Paul E
Guest
IIRC, Bill James, argued that Baylor’s season was virtually indistinguishable from Singleton’s. And, the Orioles won the division (and pennant) as well. I can’t recall if the basis of his argument was ‘offensive winning percentage” or Win Shares ( I believe the former). I believe it was in one of those “annuals” he used to do (as opposed to BJHBA). I believe offensive winning percentage formed the majority of his early opinions as opposed to win shares in the later years. Like everybody else back then, his fielding analysis wasn’t as developed as what we have today. But, Baylor couldn’t… Read more »
David P
Guest

The other day I mentioned the rarity of the double-play/sac-fly, and now we just had another one. Red Sox trailing the Yankees 5-3 in the top of the ninth. They load the bases with none out against Chapman. Benintendi hits a sac fly to left, with Nunez being thrown out at third. So instead of 5-4 wth runners on 1st and 2nd and one out, they have a runner on second with two out. And from there, they lose the game….

no statistician but
Guest
Focussing on Don Baylor’s 1979 season, I gradually became aware that one of his teammates was Nolan Ryan having a typical Nolan Ryan year, meaning he won a fair number of games but lost almost as many, struck out a lot of batters without managing to have a very good ERA+, and wasn’t the best pitcher on the team by several measures, including WAR. While he was active Ryan never impressed me, I’ll admit, except with his durability and longevity. Having looked at his record more closely now, I can’t say that my opinion has changed. Yes, he played on… Read more »
David P
Guest
I think for most of his career, you would have been laughed at for suggesting that Ryan was HOFer. But then came the strikeouts, the no-hitters, and 300+ wins and it became inevitable. But I remain shocked that he made it in with 98.8% of the vote. He’s 24th all-time in WAR, right ahead of Glavine and right behind Mussina. But it took him a LOT more innings to reach that same WAR total. He threw 1,000 more innings than Glavine and 1,800 more than Mussina. And remember, both Glavine and Mussia were seen more as compilers than as great… Read more »
oneblankspace
Guest

If Ryan had stuck around for one more year, he could have joined Pud Galvin and Cy Young as the only 300-game losers.

e pluribus munu
Guest

I’d chime in with agreement, nsb, but I think I’ve already used up my lifetime quota of bytes allotted to the subject of why Ryan was not a great pitcher, despite being perhaps the most talented pitcher ever. But I do recall someone writing (perhaps it was James, perhaps not) that, despite his mediocre results, MLB players were in awe of Ryan because of how difficult it was to do what he did, and I suppose there is a HoF case for someone who could do that for a 27-season career.

no statistician but
Guest
Why do you think he was the most talented pitcher ever, epm? It took him to the age of 37 to figure out how to walk fewer than half the batters he KOd. Koufax did the same much more quickly; Walter Johnson and Pete Alexander never suffered the ailment after they got their bearings; the better pitchers from Cy Young and Kid Nichols to Greg Maddox and Clayton Kershaw seem to me more talented. Back to Ford for a moment. Ford didn’t have the raw gift of a Ryan, but he did everything possible physically and mentally to hone what… Read more »
e pluribus munu
Guest

Ok, “gifted,” rather than talented. If he only had a hammer, he had the top-grade Craftsman-lifetime-guarantee hammer. I don’t think we are actually in disagreement. And I meant “perhaps,” just as in, “perhaps Feller was faster than Johnson.” I don’t know: you’d have to line ’em up.

Mike L
Guest

Thinking back, many fans looked at him for most of his career as basically a freak of nature–almost like an exciting innings-eater. There was also some controversy about his usage during some of his time in Houston. Ryan needed 4 days of rest between starts, exactly 4 days, and the rest of the staff had to work around him.

e pluribus munu
Guest
That subordination of the others on the pitching staff seems to me resonant with the effect that Ryan’s pitching style may have had on the position players behind him. I have always thought that some of Ryan’s indifferent success had to do with the pressures put on teammates who had to endure long innings and long games while Ryan pursued the “true outcomes” of strikeouts and bases on balls. As an isolated example, I compared Ryan’s fine 1977 season – his best in WAR (7.9) – with his teammate Frank Tanana’s season (Tanana had 8.3 WAR, the last of his… Read more »
David P
Guest

I looked up through 1979 and it seems like there might be some evidence for your theory. In almost every season, Ryan received below average run support, compared to the team’s average runs per game. Of course, it’s hard to say anything definitive without controlling for qualitiy of opposition pitchers.

BTW, for those who think that Ryan’s 83.9 WAR is too high…Fangraphs has him with 106.7 and Baseball Prospectus with 119.1 (!!!).

oneblankspace
Guest

’82 Angels took their 2-0 lead in California before they went to Milwaukee.

Doug
Guest

Thanks for the correction (you’d think I would have gotten that right as I attended those games in Anaheim).

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

Joey Gallo is now batting .208 !
So, maybe he will not slug .500 while stroking under the Mendoza Line.

However, his Slugging percentage is now .559
He is still in a class of his own.

Lowest batting average, with a SLG over .550.
Minimum 300 PA:

.208 … Gallo (current)
.253 … Mike Schmidt
.253 … Jason Giambi
.258 … Harmon the Killer
.259 … Todd Hundley
.260 … Jose Bautista

.262 … Jay Buhner
.262 … Barry Bonds
.262 … Curtis Granderson
.262 … Chris Davis

Daniel Longmire
Guest

Interesting, Zoomo. I could have sworn that Dave Kingman would make this list, but he actually only had one season where he slugged above .550 (1980 – .613), and batted .288 that year.

no statistician but
Guest
I’m rather late to the discussion of Fred Lynn vs. Kirby Puckett so I’m making this a fresh comment. I think there was a great deal of difference between Lynn and Puckett besides the facts that Puckett grew up in a housing project, was black, short, and had a funny looking build, while Lynn came from a well-off suburban background, was white, tall, and slender. The first and most important difference between the two as players is simply consistency. Kirby was consistent and Lynn wasn’t—except for hitting 23 HRs four years running. Even early on in his career Lynn had… Read more »
Paul E
Guest
Was looking at a prior thread and there was some back and forth (NSB and Voomo) about the Angels going 9-11 in the prior 20 games before Trout’s return from the DL. In the last 16, the Angels have manged to go 12-4, are now a wild card contender (actually, 5th best record in the AL), and Trout has gone .393/.541/.661. Pro rata over 162 games, that’s about 375 total bases and 183 BB’s….just another small sample size, microcosm of a long season. But, I don’t know how they could make the playoffs with Pujols batting in the top half… Read more »
no statistician but
Guest

Paul E:

I just noticed their recent streak, too. Glad to be wrong, if I am, about Trout’s impact since that post.

Paul E
Guest

Well, right or wrong, I can’t believe they’re contending, with or without Trout. But, it’s still ‘early’.
If you go on baseball-reference, Andrelton Simmons leads the team in WAR and a good portion of that is derived from fielding – which has always been debated on this site. I don’t disagree with the fact that fielding has an impact on the outcome of MLB games, I just don’t know the extent of that impact nor trust how it’s measured.
But, it also looks like Simmons has figured out how to hit ML pitching

mosc
Guest
Haven’t been on here enough, I apologize. Thought of a random stat question. Chad Green (yes I’m a Yankees fan sorry) is doing this ~2IP out of the pen routine fairly regularly now. It strikes me as extreme uncommon. He hasn’t even thrown 50 innings in relief this season but he’s spent time in the minors. Since his 2 inning spot start he’s been used 19 times for 32 innings which on pace would be 69 appearances and… the number that’s curious… 115 IP. I feel like there are scant examples of guys throwing 100 innings in relief. They either… Read more »
mosc
Guest

So I forgot all the bigtime 80s relievers pitched more than I thought they did. AGAIN.

Willie Hernandez was over 100 inning last in 1985, as was Dan Quisenberry. Sutter and Gossage ticked the box for the last time in ’84 but Mark Eichhorn did it as recently as ’87. I miss anybody else?

Anybody post 1987?

David P
Guest

Hey Mosc! Welcome back!

The PI shows 53 seasons since 1988 with 100+ IP and all innings in relief. Though the last to pull it off was Scott Proctor in 2006 with the Yankees. And the last to do it while averaging 2+ innings per relief appearance was Steve Sparks in 2003 (split between the Tigers and A’s).

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

We’ll see what they do with Green next year. If he develops a 3rd, 4th pitch he’s certainly starter material.
But that high heat!
Only Kimbrel is creating more swings and misses with the 4-seamer:

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/pitchfx/leaderboards/index.php?hand=&reportType=pfx&prp=RP&month=&year=2017&pitch=FA&ds=ws&lim=200

Doug
Guest
Jim Acker (1989) is the last pitcher with 50 relief appearances of more than an one inning. The most such appearances since 1990 are 44 by Jeremy Hernandez (1993) and Scot Shields (2004). The most since Shields are 37 by Scott Proctor (2006) and Anthony Swarzak (2013). Next is 35 by 3 pitchers, including Dellin Betances (2014) and Erasmo Ramirez (2016). The most such appearances for a team is 201 by the 1985 Braves. The most in the last 10 years in 161 by the 2012 Rockies. Necessity was a major factor for both teams which lost 96 and 98… Read more »
David P
Guest

Jose Altuve currently has a .807 OPS at home, and 1.169 on the road (.991 ovearll). Someone with a PI subscription will need to check his exact placement but that would definitely be one of the 10 greatest road seasons ever (relative to overall performance). Chris Carter’s 2013 season is at #10 with a +.155 difference between Road and overall OPS. Altuve is +.178.

Richard Chester
Guest

The largest such difference is by Johnny Logan with .192 in 1957 followed by Steve Finley with .186 in 1997 (502 PA min.) Then comes Altuve.

David P
Guest

Thanks as always Richard!!!

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

Joey Votto has reached base at least twice in 19 straight games.
Bonds did 20.
Ted Williams has the record at 21.

Here’s their slashes during those streaks:

.450 / .612 / .767 / 1.378
.383 / .667 / .766 / 1.433
.486 / .635 / .851 / 1.486

Williams played in 4 doubleheaders during his streak.

Paul E
Guest

3 walks last night makes it 20

Doug
Guest

Votto’s streak ends at 20 games, after a 1 for 4 and no walks in a 7-6 walk-off loss to the Cubs. Votto was due to lead off the top of the 10th if the Reds could have held the Cubs at bay in the 9th. They couldn’t.

David P
Guest

In streaky strikeout news, Aaron Judge has now struck out in 32 straight games, trying Adam Dunn’s single season record.

Meanwhile, the Cleveland indians have struck out 10+ batters for 12 straight games, a MLB record.

Doug
Guest

Make it 33, and a new record for His Honor.

Richard Chester
Guest

That is the record for a position player. Dunn struck out in the first 32 games of 2012 and also in the last 4 games of the 2011 season for a total of 36 games.

Voomo Zanzibar
Guest

Nick Markakis has quietly put together a notable career.
He just passed 2000 hits at age 33.
And his 1742 games in RF is 16th all-time.
However, he is less than 2 full seasons from the top 5, and a bit more than 3 seasons from topping Clemente for 1st.

In his 12 year career he has missed time in only one season, 2012, but to a couple of freak broken-bone-in-hand injuries.

Mike L
Guest

Interesting career. Peaked in 2008 at age 24 with 7.4 bWAR. Played is virtually every game since then except for the broken hand and in those nearly nine years has never had a season over 2.9. His career WAA since then is a cumulative -3.7.

David P
Guest

Indians’ pitchers combined for 18 strikeouts today, giving them 11 games this season of 15+ Ks in games of 9 innings of less. That appears to be a new MLB record. They also extended their MLB record to 13 straight games with 10+ Ks. Soft throwing Ryan Merritt starts game two of today’s doubleheader, so that streak is in definite jeopardy.

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