Verlander twirls third no-hitter

Justin Verlander no-hit the Blue Jays on Sunday, allowing just one walk and retiring the final 26 batters in order. He becomes just the fifth pitcher since 1893 with three no-hit games, joining Nolan Ryan (7), Sandy Koufax (4), Bob Feller (3) and Cy Young (3). More on Verlander’s gem is after the jump.

Verlander’s gem encompassed 120 pitches, 79 thrown for strikes. Fourteen Blue Jays were retired by strikeout as Verlander reached 250 K’s for the season, joining Nolan Ryan, Randy Johnson, Max Scherzer and Roger Clemens with his fifth such campaign. Verlander struck out at least one batter in every inning, and struck out the side in the eighth frame (his 14 K’s were one fewer than his career high set this past June in just 7 innings against the Brewers). Verlander also had to deal with the stress of pitching in a scoreless game for eight innings; Houston finally broke through in the 9th on a 2-run home run by the unlikely named Abraham Toro, playing only his 8th career game and, a Canadian native, doing so in front of friends and family in Toronto (Toro also got to close out the game by fielding the 27th out).

Verlander joins Nolan Ryan, Cy Young, Randy Johnson, Hideo Nomo, and Mike Fiers in pitching a no-hit game for more than one franchise. This was Verlander’s second no-hitter against Toronto, becoming only the third pitcher to no-hit the same team twice; Tim Lincecum‘s two no-nos both came against the Padres, while Addie Joss twice victimized the White Sox. Both of Verlander’s no-nos against the Blue Jays were pitched in Toronto, as he becomes the 8th pitcher with two no-hitters away from home. This was only Verlander’s 14th game pitched against Toronto; when he doesn’t no-hit them he hasn’t fared well, going 1-1 with a 4.44 ERA at Rogers Centre and 1-5, 5.68 at home.

This no-hitter comes eight seasons after Verlander’s last gem, also against Toronto on May 7, 2011. That’s the second longest spell between no-hit games, trailing only the 9 seasons between Nolan Ryan’s 5th and 6th no-hitters. Of 231 no-hit games since 1908, this was the 50th recorded in September, more than any other month. This was the second no-hitter this season (excl. team no-hitters), but only the sixth over the past four seasons, one of the lower totals for a four year period. In contrast, the four prior seasons (2012-15) saw no fewer than 20 no-hit games, the most in any four-year span.

Verlander becomes the 10th Astro pitcher with a no-hit game, the most for any expansion franchise. The Astros also have two team no-hitters, the second coming just last month against Seattle. For Toronto, it’s their 6th time to be no-hit, four of them coming at home at the Rogers Centre/Skydome. Only two other ballparks have seen as many no-hit games by a visitor: Tiger Stadium (6) and Fenway Park (4).

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John
Guest

Great article about a great pitcher. One problem: Addie Joss pitched for Cleveland. His no-no and his perfecto were both against the White Sox, not the Cubs.

Bob Eno (epm)
Guest
As Doug notes, Verlander threw 120 pitches, which is a lot; 79 were strikes, for a rate of 66%. What is the significance of those numbers? What do they tell us? Verlander’s game was terrific, near-perfect: he had a game score of 100, which is very rare. But how good is a 66% strike rate? The four pitchers who lost to Verlander threw a combined 128 pitches; 88 were strikes, for a rate of 69%. They gave up 5 hits, one walk, and two runs; a good game. Verlander threw 1.46 balls per batter and 2.82 strikes; the Toronto crew… Read more »
John
Guest
81 strikes & no balls would be a great game. That is, unless the good portion of those are grooved. Raw data is just that. Raw. Verlander did a good job with his strikes, & the balls were likely close. The point being, it is results that count. In our hypothetical game of 81 strikes, it’s not a good game if those 81 strikes resulted in 12 hits & 8 runs in 3 innings. This is the problem with sabremetrics. We get so enthralled be the stats we miss the poetic beauty of the game. A no-hitter is truly a… Read more »
Bob Eno (epm)
Guest
Your correction concerning my 81-strikes example is on target, John. The larger point I was making is not far from yours: that the pitches-strikes stat is not actually data relevant enough to be very useful. Clearly, Verlander did a good job with his strikes, as you say. I just went though all of the charts for Jay PAs is the games and, in fact, most of his balls were not very close (I didn’t count: I’d say maybe 20% were, but only one or two borderline — the 4-1 walk he gave up to Biggio wasn’t close at all). On… Read more »
Mike L
Guest

Bob, I have a memory of an extended interview done with Tom Seaver in which he talks about setting up a hitter by deliberately throwing balls. But I also keep thinking about that Bo Belinski no-hitter where he walked four and hit two other batters. https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/LAA/LAA196205050.shtml. Old-fashioned game–2 hours flat.

Paul E
Guest
Mike L
Guest

And, there’s this immortal performance by Jim Maloney
10 IP no hitter, 12K, 10 walks. https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CHN/CHN196508191.shtml

Bob Eno (epm)
Guest

I guess that beats Ryan’s eight-walk nine-inning masterpiece: https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CAL/CAL197409280.shtml

If you’ve never read Bill Veeck’s description of Bobo Holloman’s no-hitter, it’s reproduced in Holloman’s SABR biography. Veeck called the game the “quaintest no-hitter in the history of the game” — or at least his terrific ghost writer, Ed Linn, did. (There’s a great story about an argument they had when Veeck’s autobiography was almost done: Linn wrote an apology explaining that after all their time together, he’d come to think he was Veeck, and Veeck said, never mind, after all that time he’d come to believe he’d written his autobiography.)

Paul E
Guest

GOK how many pitches Maloney threw in that one. Based on the 14K back to back business by Verlander and Cole discussed here, and then the 14K’s back to back to back by Pedro J Martinez, I figured I would check out the Randy Johnson big K games and found this 160 pitch gem against the Rangers back when The Big Unit was just beginning to find himself.

https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/TEX/TEX199209270.shtml

Despite the workload, he went on to win another 254 or so games

Mike L
Guest

Maloney was finished after his age 29 season. Combined 46 IP in the two seasons after, then retired.

John
Guest

I agree with you, Bob. Some if not most of the balls were likely to set up another pitch. Watching the Cubs growing up, I’d listen to Jack Brickhouse as he would talk often about how Fergie set that batter up perfectly by throwing him a curve ball out of the strike zone, then coming in with the fast ball for strike three. Learned a lot about pitching that way. Never could pitch, but K learned the theory!

Doug
Guest

Gerrit Cole followed Verlander with a 14 K game of his own on Monday. Said to be the first instance in the live ball era of a team’s starters striking out 14 or more in consecutive games.

Doug
Guest
P-I confirms this result going back to 1908. Closest to doing it previously were: – Stephen Strasburg/Max Scherzer in same week in Jun/Jul 2019 – Frank Tanana/Nolan Ryan in same series in Oct 1976 – Burt Hooton/Fergie Jenkins in same week in Sep 1971 – Tom Seaver/Nolan Ryan in same week in Apr 1970 Pedro Martinez has the only streak of three 14 K starts, in Sep,1999; he also has two back-to-backs, in May 1999 and May 2000. Randy Johnson has three back-to-backs, Sam McDowell and Chris Sale have two, and Gerrit Cole (his last two starts), Clayton Kershaw, Corey… Read more »
Richard chester
Guest

When I return from vacation I might be able to do prior to 1908.

Doug
Guest

Gerrit Cole on Sunday made it three straight starts with 14+ K’s to join Pedro as the only pitchers with that back-to-back-to-back.

Doug
Guest

Edwin Encarnacion returned to the Yankee lineup on Tuesday and belted his 10th home run in pinstripes. Yankees break their own record, set last season, with 13 players having 10 or more HR. There are 100 teams with 9 or more such players, including 14 teams so far this season, still with most of September still to play.

Mike L
Guest

I’m thinking of starting an on-line campaign to use a wiffleball.

Voomo
Guest

Maybin needs 2 to get them to 14 players.
And certainly Giancarlo will come back and hit 10 in the last 2 weeks.

Voomo
Guest

Daniel Palka is now 1-49.
That is, one hit in 49 at bats.
Plus 6 walks and a HBP.

The play-index seems to be misbehaving right now, cant get it to exclude Pitchers in my search for worst BA in a season of 50+ PA, but let’s just say that Palka is probably losing some sleep.

Doug
Guest
Palka’s .020 BA is by far the lowest in a 50 PA season. Second is Lyn Lary’s .056 (3 for 54) in 1940. I expect Palka will be fine; he was called up after a 27 HR season in the minors this year, matching his 27 HR in the majors last year. Palka has the lowest BA down to 41 PA or 38 AB, before Eugenio Velez and his 0 for 37 in 2011 takes the prize. But, Palka has company, challenged by Eric Stamets’ .049 for the Tribe (unlike Palka, Stamets hasn’t been called up). The all-time lowest non-zero… Read more »
Paul E
Guest

A little more theatre of the absurd, Tim Anderson has the fewest BB amongst MLers qualified for the batting title with 11. He also leads the AL in batting average at .331 ! Has this ever happened before?

Voomo
Guest

Fewest walks in a qualifying season with at least a .325 batting average is 15, by Charlie Hickman in 1902.

Voomo
Guest

Fewest while leading the league in batting average was 19, by Hal Chase, who batted .339

Voomo
Guest

Chase is probably the right answer, I didn’t search for below a 325 batting average

Doug
Guest

Nap Lajoie also had 19 walks when he led the AL with a .378 BA in 1902.

Paul E
Guest

In addition to Tim Anderson, the Orioles’ Hanser Alberto is batting .321 with 13 BB in 480 PA’s….

Doug
Guest

Hasn’t happened since 1893. Batting Average ranks for qualified players leading their league in fewest walks.
3rd – Garry Templeton (1980, 1977), Manny Sanguillen (1970), Roberto Clemente (1956)
5th – Ben Revere (2014)
6th – Gee Walker (1932), Bob Fothergill (1929), Freddy Leach (1926)
7th – Mickey Rivers (1976), Jay Kirke (1912), Ossee Schrecongost (1902), Nap Lajoie (1900)
8th – Ernie Lombardi (1937)
10th – Tony Pena (1982), Ted Easterly (1912)

Mike L
Guest

How can you not love Ernie Lombardi? 430 career walks, 262 career strike outs, career SP of .460

Doug
Guest
Speaking of low walk rates, Kevin Pillar is on pace for his 5th consecutive season with 30 doubles and no better than 95 OPS+, tying him with Orlando Cabrera (2006-10) for the longest run of such seasons. Pillar has averaged 23 walks for those seasons compared to 43 walks for Cabrera (Cabrera’s 84 OPS+ is second lowest to Omar Vizquel in a 400 double career; Cabrera had three more doubles than Vizquel in over 3000 fewer AB). Still, at age 30 (for Pillar) with almost 16 WAR, that’s not a bad career for a 32nd round draft pick. With only… Read more »
Paul E
Guest

The guys on the MLB channel/Network (or whatever it’s caled) have been talking about Pillar as if he were the second coming of W H Mays….”turned this team around”….”made them buyers at the deadline”. By the same token, he catches the ball and, if he’s going to swing at anything and everything, bat him 7th and let him knock in runs.

Doug
Guest

Pillar drew a 9th inning bases loaded walk against the Red Sox on Thursday. Only the second walk of his career in 73 PA with the sacks filled.

Doug
Guest
Two HR, both with two strikes, for Bo Bichette against Tampa on Thu, one to right in a 13-pitch AB to start the game, the other a 2-out, 2-run shot to left to tie the game in the 7th. That gives him 25 XBH for his first 34 games; only Joe D (a ridiculous 28 games) has been faster to that threshold. According to the P-I, 13 pitches is the longest AB for a HR leading off a game since Dave Martinez went deep on the 15th pitch against the Cubs on Jun 23, 1989. Like Bichette, Martinez added a… Read more »
Doug
Guest

The D-Backs made it two seasons in a row with a team having a pair of 30 HR switch-hitters (Eduardo Escobar and Ketel Marte), following the Indians last year with Francisco Lindor and Jose Ramirez. This had never happened before 2018.

Doug
Guest
From the sublime to the … well, not so sublime. The A’s Mike Fiers, in a season featuring his second no-hit game, on Monday against the Astros became the first searchable pitcher to allow 5 HR in an outing of 1 IP or less. His start was also the 9th allowing 9+ hits and 9+ ER in 1 IP or less, all of them coming since 1994. Fiers’ A’s have turned the tables on the Astros on Tuesday, with Houston pitcher Joe Biagini becoming just the second reliever (after Mark Melancon in 2012) to allow 6 ER, including 3 HR,… Read more »
Doug
Guest

Boston’s 159 game streak with an extra-base hit ended on Wed in Toronto. The top 5 longest streaks.
164 games – Boston 2004-05
161 games – Cleveland 1995-96, Cincinnati 1999-2000
159 games – Boston 2018-19
151 games – Cincinnati 2000-01

There was one game between the two Reds streaks, as Cincinnati recorded an extra-base hit in 312 of 313 games.

Josh Davis
Guest

The correlation between these streaks and success is somewhat less than I would have expected. None of those three Cincy teams made the playoffs, and neither will this 2019 Red Sox team.

Voomo
Guest

Reds didn’t make the playoffs no, but that ’99 team was the last squad with 96+ wins to not.
Only team with that many to not since the 103 win ’93 Giants in the last year of no WC.

Voomo
Guest

Anybody here have a functional argument in favor of the concept:

“We’re not going to use our best Pitcher in a tie game in the 9th inning on the road.” ?

‘Cause seriously, we’re going deep into the 2nd decade of this being the status quo, and I swear it’s giving me angina.

Doug
Guest
The argument would be that you save that best pitcher (i.e. your closer) to save the game after you take the lead. But, obviously, the risk you run is that the home team wins the game before you can take that lead, as was the case for the Yankees last night in losing to Toronto (which, I’m guessing is what led to your comment). The other argument is about not putting your closer in an unfamiliar situation, given that some closers tend to be less effective in non-save situations. The numbers since 1990, looking only at pitcher seasons of 25+… Read more »
Voomo
Guest

Gosh darnit, Doug, I know what the arguments are.
I was trying to ask if any of the people who write here agree with the arguments.

Voomo
Guest

Because I challenge anyone to defend the logic that defending a one run lead is a ‘save’ whereas defending a tie in a sudden death situation is the job of a floppy rookie with a 7.00 era.

Doug
Guest
The other aspect of strategy that comes into play is using your best pitchers in game situations in which you have the best chance of winning. Thus, managers do tend to use their closer in the 9th inning of tie games at home, because there won’t be a save situation, but also because, as the home team, they do have a better chance of winning the game than their opponent (although, you wouldn’t know it this season, as home teams are 84-100 in extra-inning games). But, as you say, it’s tough if not impossible to find anything compelling about the… Read more »
Doug
Guest

The Dodgers tried a different tack with their closer on Sunday, bringing Jansen into a tied road game in the 8th inning; when LA took the lead in the 9th, they removed Jansen and used two pitchers to close out the win.

Doug
Guest

Cubs finished off their demolition of the Pirates with a third straight game of 14+ runs. totaling 47 runs overall. Just the fourth such streak, after these ones:
– Tigers: Aug 10-12, 1993, 47 runs, vs. Orioles
– Cubs: Jun 1-4, 1930, 49 runs, vs. Pirates/Braves
– Pirates: Aug 2-4, 1928, 46 runs, vs. Phillies

oneblankspace
Guest

The Sox trailed the Mariners 5-0 on Sunday 15th, then led 10-5. Seattle tied the game in the 8th and walked in the winning run in the ninth. How often do both teams have a 5-run lead?

Doug
Guest

Not exactly what you’re talking about, but reminded me of another Sox-Mariners game with a 5-spot figuring prominently. Scoreless game through 13 innings, then both teams score 5 runs in the 14th inning; Sox won it with a pair in the 16th.

https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/SEA/SEA201306050.shtml

Scary Tuna
Guest

I have to believe that’s rare, oneblankspace. If I’m thinking of it correctly, the minimum score would need to be 10-5. After falling behind by five runs or more, one team would need to outscore the other by at least 10 runs for the next stretch of the game.

It would be even less common to see a game like today, in which Seattle led by five, fell behind by five, then came back to win.

Richard Chester
Guest

Do you mean an exactly 5 run lead or a lead of 5+ runs?

Richard Chester
Guest

I did an analysis for 9-inning games only from 1901-2018 in which teams exchanged leads of 5+ runs. I found 228 games. I cannot guarantee that this number is correct. Last one was on 7/15/2018 between between the Phils and Miami and the first one was on 6/30/1910 between the Cubs and the Cards.

Richard Chester
Guest

I did a more comprehensive analysis and came up with 337 such games. The time span is actually 1907-2018 and includes the Federal League. The earliest game was on 6/14/1909 between the A’s and the Browns and the most recent one was on 8/10/2018 between the Red Sox and the Orioles. I hope this is correct, it was not a easy search.

Scary Tuna
Guest
Thanks, Richard. I can imagine that was difficult to determine. So, 337 such games would make it slightly more common than a no-hitter, though far less noteworthy due to the arbitrariness of the occurrence (there is nothing inherently more interesting about both teams leading by five runs in a game than by either four or six runs). The next time we are curious about the frequency of an event, instead of speculating, I might just ask, “Hey, Richard, can you figure this out?” I have no doubt you’ll come up with an answer while I will still be trying to… Read more »
Richard Chester
Guest

Scary, thanks for the kind words. In case you’re wondering I did not use the Pi or baseball-reference at all in my search. I used gamelog data extracted from retrosheet.

Richard Chester
Guest

The highest exchange of leads that I could find occurred on 5/7/1999. The Devil Rays had a 9-1 lead over the Indians after 3 1/2 innings, but the Indians came back for a 20-11 victory. The Tribe scored 7 runs in each of the 7th and 8th innings, only 1 of 4 times a team scored 7 runs in 2 consecutive innings.

Doug
Guest

A very quirky bit of trivia. The Mets’ Justin Wilson on Sunday was tagged with a blown save in an outing that featured a walk, a balk and a wild pitch. Only the third such game by a left-hander in an appearance of one inning or less, all of them coming against the Dodgers (there are two such appearances of more than 1 IP, both in the AL and both in 1988).

Paul E
Guest

Doug,
A little further bit of quirky, Jose Abreu, CWS, leads the AL in RBI, GIDP, and SF. I checked the usual suspects – Torre, Aaron, Yaz, Pujols, Rice, and found no one else duplicating the trifecta. Just seems like something that ‘probably’ did happen before, no?

Paul E
Guest

spoke too soon – Miguel Tejada 2004…sorry

Scary Tuna
Guest

Your hunch was right, Paul.

Voomo
Guest

Tony Gwynn led the league in double plays while batting .394

Doug
Guest

In Frank Robinson’s triple crown season in 1966, he also led in SF and had his career high in GIDP with 24, one fewer than AL leaders George Scott and Rocky Colavito.

Paul E
Guest

Rocco could really throw……but could not run. And, he didn’t strike out an inordinant amount so, by putting the ball in play (and probably hitting it hard), the result can be G I DP with great frequency – a la Aaron (who ran well) and Pujols.
I believe a ratio of SO/GIDP can be search on the b-r Play Index

Paul E
Guest

Thanks Doug !! Quite a few Hall of Famers on that list – could make a pretty fair everyday 8…or 9. Lots of depth at catcher. But, no Joe Torre

Doug
Guest

Missing a true power hitter, but not surprising there isn’t one on this list.

Paul E
Guest

I guess Mattingly is your power hitter or, at least he was prior to damaging his back from constantly hitting off a tee. Many grand slams one season…..8 straight homering games. Donnie was the bomb….ton of extra base hits.

Then there’s always “Veek” Power:
Waiter: I’m sorry sir, we don’t serve Negroes.
Power: That’s OK. I don’t eat them.

Doug
Guest

Or they could go with Joe D, who would be the team’s CFer. GIDPs were not counted in the AL until 1939, so Joe’s ratio for 1939-51 would be 2.09 from 272 SO and 130 GIDP.

Doug
Guest

The Orioles’ Chris Davis is currently sporting an even 50 OPS+ for his past two seasons. That would be the lowest recorded since 1893 for players with 800+ PA aged 32-33. The lowest 10.
50 – Chris Davis (2018-19)
51 – Alfredo Griffin (1990-91), Billy Sullivan (1907-08)
52 – Bob Lillis (1962-63)
57 – Doug Flynn (1983-84)
59 – Rabbit Warstler (1936-37), George McBride (1913-14)
60 – Tony Womack (2002-03), Denny Doyle (1976-77)
61 – Hughie Critz (1933-34), Mickey Doolin (1912-13)

Davis had 267 HR thru age 31 compared to 136 for the rest of this group combined.

Mike L
Guest

Davis’ complete collapse is bizarre. He reminds me more of a good hitting middle infielder who just loses it in his early twenties more than anyone else I can think of. He’s so bad Baltimore is PH for him more–329 PA in 100 games.

Paul E
Guest

Mike L
I think I read somewhere that Davis lost his Ritalin/Adderall expemption – no kidding – and much to the chagrin of the Oriloes’ front office.
Did anyone ever notice that the first three letters of Adderall are “A-D-D”? Must be a marketing ploy…..

Mike L
Guest

Paul E, I suppose that could be it (although you would think he might be able to get it back). His drop off is so sharp (without serious injury) and hitting is so hard, that you wonder whether he doesn’t have a little “Steve Blass” going on.

Paul E
Guest

Or “Steve Sax” or “Chuck Knoblauch”… But, the whole idea of failing to live up to even a fraction of the $ 161 Million has really got to weigh on him. At this point, it’s not snowballing – it’s an avalanche without survivors. Pretty sad.

Doug
Guest

Bob Lillis had 1000 more PA for his career after age 33, during which he “improved” to 60 OPS+ (guess they were looking for him to recapture the magic of his debut campaign, batting .391 in 20 games despite starting 0 for 9).

Doug
Guest

Justin Smoak hit his 21st HR of the season on Tuesday. It was also his 21st HR in the 9th or extra innings since 2017; nobody else has reached 15 over that span.

Doug
Guest

The Blue Jays’ Cavan Biggio cycled on Tuesday, joining Charlie Moore (1980) as the only searchable players to do so while also stealing two bases. Biggio joins his father with a cycle, said to be just the second father/son to do so, after Gary and Daryle Ward.

It was Toronto’s first cycle since 2001. Longest current cycle droughts belong to the Reds (1989), Royals (1990), Cubs (1993) and Marlins (never).

Doug
Guest

Biggio, incidentally, is leading the majors in OBP, and ranks 7th in SLG, since Aug 29 (min. 50 PA).

Voomo
Guest

San Francisco and Boston tied the record for most Pitchers used in a game, with 24.
And the Giants won their first game in Fenway in 104 years.
Oh, and a Yastrzemski hit a home run.

Meanwhile, Miguel Rojas has 6 RBI without scoring a Run.
That had happened 17 searchable times up to 1950.
Then just once between 1950 and 1984.
Rojas’ effort is the 12th since 1991, and the first since Chirs Colabello in 2014.

And just the 2nd time it has been done by a Shortstop (Stan Rojek in 1948).

Scary Tuna
Guest
If Colabello was the last to do so, it would have definitely been in early April of 2014. It was a memorable month. We had a late spring so it was freezing cold in Minnesota, but Chris Colabello was briefly the hottest hitter in the big leagues. He came up through an Independent league, debuting at 28 with the Twins the year prior. In 2014 he made the club out of spring training as a RF/DH and hit everything in sight. He was over .400 a couple weeks in and above .350 in late April. He finished the month with… Read more »
Scary Tuna
Guest
Looks like he was sent down in late May, recalled in July, then played his last game for the Twins in early August. Wow, the 2014 season seems like a lifetime ago! Only one Twins position player and two pitchers that year are still on their roster. Jorge Polanco had 8 PA, while Kyle Gibson and Trevor May started 40 games between them and had one relief appearance. But it’s the 2014 AL standings that I hardly recognize. In the postseason the Royals beat the A’s in the wild card game, then they topped the Angels in the ALDS, while… Read more »
Doug
Guest

Colabello has the distinction of being the only retired player in the past 10 years to bat .300 over his last two seasons (min. 300 PA). There were 14 such players from 1995 to 2008, but only three over the preceding 45 seasons (1950 to 1994).

Doug
Guest

Nine one-run games on Wednesday. Maybe Richard can tell us when that has happened before.

Richard Chester
Guest

I have already posted on Twitter that there are 18 dates from 1901-2018 in which there were more than nine 1-run games (includes FL). I will search for the number of dates with at least nine such games.

Richard Chester
Guest

I came up with these results:
4 dates with exactly 11 1-run games
14 dates with exactly 10 1-run games
73 dates with exactly 9 1-run games.

Remember, this is through 2018 only.

Doug
Guest

Thanks Richard,

So, about once every 225 days or so, or about 7½ months worth of games.

Doug
Guest

Albert Pujols went 0 for 4 in the Angels’ Thursday loss in New York as the Yanks clinched the division. His career BA is now below .300, his first time under that mark at the end of a game since the 4th game of his career.

Mike L
Guest

Old enough to remember that sad feeling when Mickey Mantle dropped below .300.

Mike L
Guest

One more comment about this….his cumulative BA in St. Louis was .328, and with LA it’s been .258, a drop of 70 points. But it’s really startling startling how much his OBP has dropped. .420 in St. Louis, .314 in LA.

Doug
Guest

But, with his RBi the night before, Pujols moved past Hank Aaron with his 17th season of 20 HR and 90 RBI. And, that’s 17 of 19 seasons for Albert (all of his qualified seasons), compared to 16 of his first 20 for Hank. Pujols’ contract has only two more seasons; he will probably need 3 or 4 more campaigns to pass Aaron for the career RBI record.

Mike L
Guest

I’m not arguing Albert’s career won’t ultimately be judged by his total accomplishments. I’m just struck by the length of the decline. 8 years with LAA, 1109G, 211 HR, 743 RBI, 259/.314/.452 triple slash, OPS+111, 11.9 BWAR.
In St.Louis he was Lou Gehrig. In LA, about Eric Hosmer.

Voomo
Guest

Highest SLG by a Catcher, min 300 PA:

.687 … Javy Lopez
.667 … Ivan Rod
.651 … Rudy York
.646 … Mitch Garver*

.638 … Piazza
.631 … Napoli
.630 … Hartnett
.617 … Dickey

Voomo
Guest

Most HR, fewer than 400 PA:

32 … Mark McMac
31 … Garver (343)
30 … Kevin Mitchell
30 … Tony Clark
29 … Ted Williams
29 … Mark McMac

Mike L
Guest

Quite a year. Only has 641 IP catching, but it’s pretty wild.

Scary Tuna
Guest
Garver’s development has been huge for a franchise that, when seeking catching help four years ago, traded Aaron Hicks straight up for John Ryan Murphy. Murphy, who is four months younger than Garver, slashed .143/.193/.220 in 26 games for the Twins in 2016, and has been a replacement level third catcher for the Diamondbacks since then. A couple sources this past week had Twins catchers one home run short of tying the record (43) held by four teams, though B-Ref credits them with 43 already. Their current production from the catching position (Garver, Jason Castro, and Willians Austudillo) this year… Read more »
Scary Tuna
Guest

Catchers with at least 1.000 OPS, min 300 PA:

1.070…Mike Piazza…1997
1.065…Javy Lopez…2003
1.058…Jack Clements….1895
1.046…Mike Napoli…2011
1.045…Bill Dickey…1936
1.042…Ivan Rodriguez…2000
1.034…Gabby Hartnett…1939
1.031…Joe Mauer…2009
1.026…Rudy York….1937
1.012…Piazza…2000
1.009…Mitch Garver…2019*
1.006…Piazza…1995
1.006…Roy Campanella…1953
1.001…Chris Hoiles…1993

Voomo
Guest

Most Wins with an ERA over 3

28 … Dizzy Dean
28 … Jack Coombs
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 4

24 … Lefty Gomez
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 5

20 … Bobo Newsom
20 … Ray Kremer
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 6

15 … Wes Ferrell
15 … Guy Bush
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 7

10 … Colby Lewis
9 ….. Jack Knott
9 ….. Jim Walkup
9 …. Chris George
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 8

5 … Brad Havens
__________

Most Wins with an ERA over 9

4 … Albie Lopez
4 … Roy Halladay
4 … Sean Bergman

Bergman and Halladay in the same year, with the same number of IP.

Scary Tuna
Guest
In their 4-3 loss to the Twins tonight, Royals pitchers struck out just a single batter, which seemed an anomaly in 2019 – and it is. If I searched correctly, there have been seven other games this season with one team recording a lone strikeout. This made me wonder how long it has been since there was a game with no strikeouts by one team. The last time was 09/07/17, involving these same teams. On that night, not a single KC batter struck out, though Minnesota prevailed 4-2. There were two others game like it in 2017, two in 2016,… Read more »
Mike L
Guest

Nice work, Scary. I wonder how prevalent it was in the 1950’s

Scary Tuna
Guest

Thanks, Mike. I picked a single year (1953) and found 63 games in which one of the teams had no strikeouts.

Voomo
Guest

There have been 16 instances since 1901 of a player batting .330 in a pure rookie season of at least 300 AB:

.347 … Luis Arraez*
.350 … Ichiro
.349 … Boggs
.333 … Ashburn
.331 … Pesky

.334 … Keller
.335 … Roy Weatherly
.373 … George Watkins (1930)
.343 … Dale Alexander
.332 … Earl Averill

.355 … Lloyd Waner
.336 … Paul Waner
.350 … Cuckoo Christensen
.331 … Cochrane
.334 … Manush
.342 … Patsy Dougherty

Richard Chester
Guest

I’m sure that Arraez is thrilled to be on the same list as Cuckoo Christensen.

Voomo
Guest

Almost certain that Cuckoo is the only 1st year player to lead the league in OBP.

Richard Chester
Guest

Looks like he was, at least from 1901 and on.

Doug
Guest

Before 1901, only Pete Browning did it, in 1882 in the AA. However, more than half of the AA’s players (63 of 108) in 1882 were making their major league debut. Shoeless Joe and Benny Kauff (in the FL) are the only other rookies to do so. Browning is the AA’s career leader in BA, and ranks 3rd, 4th and 3rd in the AA in career OBP, SLG and OPS (min. 1000 PA).

Scary Tuna
Guest

I enjoy some of the entries like his at Baseball-Reference: “Cuckoo Christensen; Nicknames: Seacap.” If your nickname is common enough to replace your given name, I’m not sure why anyone feels the need to bestow a second nickname…

Does anyone know his story? When his second year wasn’t living up to the standards of his rookie season was he relegated back to “the minors” of his era, never to return? It sounds like he played into the mid-1930s. Was an injury involved or was he just unable to rekindle the magic of his first year?

Mike L
Guest

Baseball-Reference shows him playing in the minor again–in 1934, 7 years after his last major league game, but nothing in between. But Wiki says: ” Christensen played with the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association between 1930 and 1933, hitting .362, .325, .325 and .307.” Doesn’t look like he stopped hitting, but in an era of big bats, maybe no on wanted him.

CursedClevelander
Guest
It looked unlikely, following his disastrous 2018 season, that Josh Tomlin would ever hit the 1,000 IP qualifying mark. But after a surprisingly good season for the Braves, he’s at 974 innings – injuries aside, it seems close to a lock that he now will hit the 1,000 IP threshold. If he does, and if his walk rate stays the same, he’d have the best BB/9 (1.29) of any live ball era pitcher, beating out Dan Quisenberry (1.40) and Bob Tewksbury (1.45). He’s currently in 18th place, a hair ahead of Babe Adams. There have been other pitchers like Tomlin,… Read more »
Doug
Guest

Starting play on Monday, Blue Jay rookie Cavan Biggo had recorded 335 AB without grounding into a double play. He had also stolen 13 bases without getting caught. If he can finish the season with those two goose eggs intact, it would be the first such season for any player with 300 AB and 10 SB since GIDP and CS have been recorded.

Mike L
Guest

You realize you may have influenced the entire time-space continuum?

Doug
Guest
It’s probably worth noting that Cavan’s father Craig holds the record for most AB in a season without a GIDP, with 619 in 1997 (he was 47 for 57 in thefts). Pete Reiser in 1942 had 480 AB without a GIDP and stole 20 of 21 bases. Colby Rasmus had 346 AB in 2014 without a CS (he stole 4 bases) and only one GIDP. Red Hayworth’s 270 AB in 1944 are the most in a season without a CS or GIDP, but Red did not attempt any steals. But, no player has yet reached 140 AB in a season… Read more »
Doug
Guest
Oriole rookie outfielder Austin Hays in Monday’s game in Toronto posted the fourth searchable game of 2 HR and 4 SO, all of them coming in the past 11 seasons. It was also the fourth searchable game with 4 SO and 5 RBi, two of them coming this season (the other was also against Toronto and also by an Austin, Padres catcher Hedges). The O’s took the loss in 15 innings as Baltimore pitchers allowed 5 HR (incl. a walk-off shot) and plunked 4, the fifth team game with four of each, but the first such extra-inning tilt. The next… Read more »
Scary Tuna
Guest

While the Yankees’ and Twins’ HR hitting paces have slowed just a bit, so has the rate by which the Orioles are giving up the long ball. We still have a real race to the finish on our hands. Baltimore holds a slim edge:

Orioles…299 HR (given up) through 157 games
Yankees…298 HR through 157 games
Twins…297 HR through 156 games

Mike L
Guest

I really wonder whether the reason MLB looked the other way at these more lively balls is if even should they return to last year’s, with all the K’s, they would worry scoring would drop off. The increase in HR’s is crazy.

Scary Tuna
Guest

Since pitchers aren’t asked to work as many innings now, Bert Blyleven’s record 50 HR surrendered is safe for another year. Mike Leake currently leads the majors with 40 HR served up.

Voomo
Guest

Sandy Alcantara has the worst winning percentage of any qualifying pitcher.
5-14 is .263.

He is also tied for the ML lead in Shutouts, with 2.

Voomo
Guest

Yeah, I live and die each day by the fortunes of the team from my native The Bronx
(and yeah, it’s not grammatical, but the use of the “The” is technically correct).

And we’ve lost three of the last seven road games in walk-offs,
with Aroldis freaking Chapman sitting on the bench.

Chance Adams
Tyler Lyons
and tonight, Cory Stutterbalk Gearrin

Because.
Because you never, ever use your best pitcher in a tie game on the road.
Why?
Because.

At least Chapman is well-rested.
2.2 innings in the last 26 days.
He should be fresh to sit on the bench for that extra road game in Houston in a few weeks.

Paul E
Guest

Voom,
I aklways thought it was “The Ukraine”, not “Ukraine”. Maybe it’s from watching too much Natasha, Boris Badenov and Rocky and Bullwinkle

Robbs
Guest

It was Ukraine until Russia folded it up into the USSR, when it became “the Ukraine”. Ex Soviet Rule, they prefer to simply go by Ukraine.

Doug
Guest
Two extra-inning games on Tuesday, the 16-inning Rockies/Giants game and the 19-inning Cards/D-Backs game, rank 2nd and 3rd in most players used, with 57 and 54, respectively. The most is 58, in a Dodgers/Rockies game on Sep 15, 2015. In the Cards/D-Backs game, Arizona used 30 players, tied with the Rockies in the 2015 game for the most by one team. Of those 30 players, 13 were D-Back pitchers, tied for the most by one team with the Rockies in 2015, and with the Giants in Tuesday’s game and also their game last week against the Red Sox. The Rockies/Giants… Read more »
Voomo
Guest

In that game, Dexter Fowler became the 4th player with a HR and 5 SO, all since 1998.
The last one being Brian Dozier in 2017.
_______

Doug
Guest

There were exactly 200 pitchers used in the 17 games played on Tuesday, or 202 if you count as separate instances the two pitchers who appeared in both ends of the Phillie/Nats double-header. Said to be a record for one day. First/last season with total pitchers used (incl. position players used in mop up roles):
800+ – 2019
700-799 – 2015/2018
600-699 – 2000/2014
500-599 – 1993/2001
400-499 – 1985/1994
300-399 – 1962/1984
250-299 – 1955/1968
200-249 – 1909/1960

Perhaps if teams used fewer and better pitchers, maybe there wouldn’t be so many home runs hit?

Mike L
Guest

I really dislike the 12/13 man pitching staffs, with constant trips to the mound, and starters who get pulled after five regardless of how they are pitching.

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