All-time Wins leaders by team among single-franchise pitchers

Here are the franchise leaders for most wins by pitchers who pitched for only that franchise. Eat your heart out, Mets fans.

Diamondbacks
Geraldo Guzman – 5
Leo Rosales – 5

Angels (includes CAL, ANA, and LAA)
Scot Shields – 46
Fred Newman – 33
Ron Romanick – 31
Luis Sanchez – 28
Jason Dickson – 26

Braves (BNS, MLN, ATL)
Rick Camp – 56
Al Javery – 53
Fred Klobedanz – 53
Bill James – 37
Al Mattern / Vive Lindaman – 36

Orioles (Browns)
Jim Palmer – 268
Scott McGregor – 138
Carl Weilman – 84
Mark Williamson – 46
George Baumgardner – 38

Red Sox
Mel Parnell – 123
Bob Stanley – 115
Tex Hughson – 96
Tom Brewer – 91
Ray Collins – 84

Dodgers (BRO & LAD)
Don Drysdale – 209
Sandy Koufax – 165
Nap Rucker – 134
Carl Erskine – 122
Oscar Jones – 44

Cubs
Carl Lundgren – 91
Buttons Briggs – 44
Clay Bryant – 32
Danny Friend – 32
Vern Olsen – 30

White Sox
Ted Lyons – 260
Red Faber – 254
Jim Scott – 107
Roy Patterson – 81
Reb Russell – 80

Reds
Mario Soto – 100
Hod Eller – 60
Harry Gaspar – 46
Peaches Davis – 27
Bill Dammann – 24

Indians
Bob Feller – 266
Mel Harder – 223
Bob Lemon – 207
Addie Joss – 160
Guy Morton – 98

Rockies
Roger Bailey – 18
Manuel Corpas – 12
Ryan Speier – 7
John Burke – 4

Tigers
Hooks Dauss – 223
Tommy Bridges – 194
Fred Hutchinson – 95
Vic Sorrell – 92
John Hiller – 87

Marlins
Chuck Smith – 11
Renyel Pinto – 8
Justin Wayne – 5
Rafael Medina – 3
Kirt Ojala – 3

Astros
J.R. Richard – 107
Don Wilson – 104
Carlos Hernandez – 9
Ezequiel Astacio – 5
Mike Gallo – 4

Athletics (PHA, KCA, and OAK)
Eddie Rommel – 171
Dick Fowler – 66
Steve McCatty – 63
Mike Norris – 58
Jimmy Dygert – 57

Royals
Paul Splittorff – 166
Dennis Leonard – 144
Steve Busby – 70
Jose Rosado – 37
Brian Bevil – 5

Brewers
Teddy Higuera – 94
Bill Wegman – 81
Jerry Augustine – 55
Don August – 34
Juan Nieves – 32

Twins (WSH)
Walter Johnson – 417
Brad Radke – 148
Jim Shaw – 84
Allan Anderson – 49
Pete Redfern – 42

Expos / Nationals
Steve Rogers – 158
Ernie McAnally – 30
Jeremy Powell – 5
Shayne Bennett – 5
Tavo Alvarez / Troy Mattes – 3

Giants (NYG & SFG)
Carl Hubbell – 253
Hal Schumacher – 158
Jeff Tesreau – 115
Cliff Melton – 86
Scott Garrelts – 69

Mets
Jeff Innis – 10
Grant Roberts – 4
Joe Crawford – 4
Eric Hillman – 4
Don Florence / Takashi Kashiwada – 3

Yankees
Whitey Ford – 236
Ron Guidry – 170
Mel Stottlemyre – 164
Spud Chandler – 109
Jack Warhop – 69

Phillies
Charlie Ferguson – 99
Larry Christenson – 83
Bob Miller – 42
George Chalmers – 29
Jack Meyer – 24

Pirates
Sam Leever – 194
Vern Law – 162
Ray Kremer – 143
Steve Blass – 103
Bob Moose – 76

Padres
Brian Tollberg – 15
Mike Thompson – 4
Stan Spencer – 3
Wascar Serrano – 3
Andres Berumen / Junior Herndon / Mike Bynum – 2

Mariners
Julio Mateo – 18
Ken Cloude – 16
Rafael Carmona – 11
Kazuhiro Sasaki – 7
Tim Davis / Bobby Madritsch – 6

Cardinals
Bob Gibson – 251
Al Brazle – 97
Nat Hudson – 48
Howie Krist – 37
Mike O’Neill – 32

Rays
Travis Harper – 22
Tim Corcoran – 5
Chad Orvella – 4

Rangers (WSA)
Roger Pavlik – 47
Jeff Zimmerman – 17
John Rheinecker – 8
Gerald Alexander – 6
Wes Littlelon / Juan Dominquez – 5

Blue Jays
Luis Leal – 51
Jerry Garvin – 20
Jesse Carlson – 8
Bob File – 6
Marty Janzen – 6

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Bix
Bix
10 years ago

Mel Parnell, the Red Sox leader, passed away just the other day at the age of 89.

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
10 years ago
Reply to  Bix

Parnell is 4th all-time in wins for Red Sox pitchers behind Clemens, Cy Young, and Wakefield. Probably the best Sox lefty ever, along with Robert Moses Grove.

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
10 years ago
Reply to  Andy

“Ill Tempered”? One of the first writing-style rules drilled into me was – never use the same word twice in one sentence, use a synonym.

nightfly
10 years ago
Reply to  Lawrence Azrin

Robert Moses “Causeway” Grove?

Howard
Howard
10 years ago
Reply to  Lawrence Azrin

“along with Robert Moses Grove”? He may be the second best but he is leagues behind Grove.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
10 years ago
Reply to  Howard

If you just consider their careers with the Red Sox only Parnell was 123-75 with a .621 WP and a 3.50 ERA while Grove was 105-62 with a .629 WP and a 3.34 ERA.
They were lefties who were great at Fenway. Parnell was 71-30 and Grove was 71-22, including his games as an Athletic.

Howard
Howard
10 years ago

You’re right. I didn’t separate his Boston career from his Philadelphia career. I still think Grove, based on four season leading the AL in ERA+ w/Boston, is significantly ahead of Parnell but it’s a reasonable comparison to make.

topper009
topper009
10 years ago

Wow I’ve never heard of Hooks Dauss. Nice name (bad golf swing? No, apparently nice curveball), came up with the Tigers in 1912 just after their back-to-back-to-back pennants from 07-09. He has the most wins in DET history including players who weren’t full time Tigers. The only thing he ever led the league in were bad things, earned runs and hit batters. He almost has an OBP 100 points above his BA, .189/.284. That seems like a pretty big gap for a pitcher. Infact, here are the pitchers with the biggest BA/OBP gaps with 1000 PAs: 125 .209/.334 Urban Shocker… Read more »

MikeD
MikeD
10 years ago
Reply to  topper009

Sigh. Looking at this list reminds me that baseball players once had much better nicknames.

Luis Gomez
Luis Gomez
10 years ago
Reply to  MikeD

I agree, and no, Chris Berman’s nicknames do not count.

birtelcom
Editor
9 years ago
Reply to  topper009

Hooks Daus was a teammate of Ty Cobb for 15 seasons (1912-1926). That’s got to get you into some sort of Patience Hall of Fame. The only longer-standing Tiger teammates were Trammell and Whitaker at 19 seasons (a MLB record that will be tied when, presumably, Jeter re-joins Mariano on the Yankees this season). Among Tigers, Cash and Kaline were also teammates for 15 seasons.

Doug
Doug
9 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

Also 18 seasons for Joe Judge and Sam Rice with the Senators, and George Brett and Frank White with the Royals.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago
Reply to  Doug

If you go before 1901 there is also Honus Wagner and Fred Clarke for Louisville and Pittsburgh with 18 seasons together, although not consecutive.

Doug
Doug
9 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

Also Jim Palmer and Mark Belanger for 16 seasons with Baltimore.

I was going to say 17 seasons until I noticed that Palmer, after 30 starts, a 15-10 record and a WS shutout as a 20 year-old in 1966, found himself back in the minors for most of 1967 and all of 1968.

At 17 seasons are Pete Rose and Tony Perez, not consecutively and with two teams.

Also not consecutively and with two teams are Gil Hodges and Duke Snider, for 16 seasons.

At 15 seasons are Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt, and Robin Yount and Paul Molitor.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago
Reply to  Doug

For 17 seasons: Clemente and Mazeroski, Perez and Rose, Gantner and Yount.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago

As long as we’re at it I have with book with a list so there is no searching for me.

16 years:
Johnson and Milan
Babe Adams and Max Carey
The Waners
Hubbell and Ott
Belanger and Palmer
Dwight Evans and JIm Rice

Ed
Ed
10 years ago

Finally a team stat the Indians do good at! Only team with three 200 game winners. And most total victories with 954. Odd that they’re one of the worst with all-time team leaders for batting categories, but one of the best in a pitching category.

Hartvig
Hartvig
10 years ago
Reply to  Ed

My Tigers didn’t comport themselves quite as well as they did on the home run rolls, but they didn’t embarrass themselves either. Admittedly, old Hooks is perhaps a tad bit less well known than Walter Johnson, Whitey Ford & Bob Feller but he’s got a great nickname and that’s got to count for something.

Matt D
Matt D
10 years ago

I’m going to assume that JR Richard is the only player on this list AND on the HR list published the other day. Unless The Big Train hit enough dingers…

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
10 years ago
Reply to  Matt D

I published that abbreviated HR list. It looks like all of the pitchers on that list are also all-time wins leaders on the lists above.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
10 years ago

Whoops, I checked the wrong list, I will try again.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
10 years ago

Johnson, Gibson, Richard and Drysdale from the HR list are on this list in the number one position for their respective teams. Schumacher, Christenson and Law are in the number 2 positions on this list, Lemon is number 3 and Chandler is number 4. I hope I got it right this time.

topper009
topper009
10 years ago
Reply to  Andy

Thats 4th all-time on the strikeout list and 46th all-time on the total bases list

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
10 years ago
Reply to  topper009

And #1 in our baseball-fan hearts.

bstar
bstar
10 years ago
Reply to  Andy

So it’s safe to say traffic has improved? Although some of the long-time lovers of the previous site don’t seem to like it, I think the indentation of replies to posts and the nonlinear sequencing have made a big difference. I found it hard to sometimes follow threads on the last site because people were always having to reference what post they were referring to, and you would have to keep scrolling up to follow. We still on occasion do reference a specific post for clarity, just not with every reply. Just my opinion, though.

nightfly
10 years ago
Reply to  bstar

It depends on what you’re used to, I guess. We have a similar system at Lighthouse Hockey, and I’ve been posting and moderating there for a while now, so it’s *almost* second nature. As we recently saw, I do still mess up which reply button to hit at times.

I don’t find it too hard to follow the conversations.

bstar
bstar
10 years ago
Reply to  nightfly

I dont either, nightfly. I was talking about the old site.

Jeff H
Jeff H
10 years ago

@3 Yep. ERA+ for those guys in order: 122, 113, 119, 142, 108.

MikeD
MikeD
10 years ago

Will all former and current owners of the NY Mets please report to the principal’s office. You have ‘splainin to do!

nightfly
10 years ago
Reply to  MikeD

Let’s hear it for Pelfrey and Niese! Go for it, guys!

MikeD
MikeD
10 years ago
Reply to  nightfly

They already have it. They just have to retire right now!

John Autin
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  MikeD

Especially Pelf.

birtelcom
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  MikeD

It’s fun to tweak the Mets, of course, but remember, as we kid around, that this list is really a bit of a freak stat rather than a realistic stat. The Mets as a franchise have had some great pitchers. The fact that none of them were with the Mets for their entire careers is to some extent more a reflection of a bunch of different circumstances than some sort of franchise failure. Dwight Gooden had 157 Wins with the Mets through 1994, and 37 for other franchises through his retirement after the 2000 season. I’d be hard pressed to… Read more »

MikeD
MikeD
10 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

Birtelcom, I totally agree. I knew the list would be surprising since many of their great pitchers didn’t play there for their entire careers, but I wasn’t prepared for how surprising, especially on the win totals. I thought there would be some mid-level, or some mediocre starter who hung around for a number of years and racked up 50 or so wins. Instead, my reacion was, Who are you people and where have you hidden the real top wins pitchers! This is an organization that has always seemed to focus on pitching and they’ve have greats, and near greats and… Read more »

John Autin
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  MikeD

Look at the Astros, who began the same year as the Mets. Don Wilson and J.R. Richard appear on this list partly because their careers were tragically ended at age 29/30.

Or consider the Padres, just 7 years younger than the Mets. Not only is their “one-team” list about as paltry as the Mets’, they’ve had just one pitcher amass 100 wins (on the nose) while in a SD uniform.

birtelcom
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  John Autin

Combining the “Most Wins For the Franchise” lists of the four franchises created in the 1961-62 expansion wave gets you this: 1. Tom Seaver, 198 Wins (for the Mets) 2. Chuck Finley, 165 (Angels) 3. Dwight Gooden, 157 (Mets) 4. Joe Niekro, 144 (Astros) 5. Roy Oswalt, 143 (Astros) 6. Jerry Koosman, 140 (Mets) 7. Charlie Hough, 139 (Rangers) 8. Nolan Ryan, 138 (Angels) 9. Larry Dierker, 137 (Astros) 10. Kenny Rogers, 133 (Rangers) Nolan Ryan’s career included, and included only, stops with each of these four teams. Darren Oliver is the only other player to play for all four… Read more »

Jason Z
10 years ago
Reply to  birtelcom

In the late 70’s as the era of free agency began, some owners weren’t prepared and simply refused to acknowledge the winds that where “a changing.” And while I agree that the Mets were well served in letting Gooden leave. Seeing this list brought back the nightmare of June 15, 1977. That was the day M. Donald Grant of the Mets thought it a good idea to trade, IMO, one of the top five greatest pitchers pitchers of all time to the Reds. Pat Zachary, Doug Flynn, Dan Norman and Steve Henderson. And then after 1983, the Mets leave him… Read more »

John Autin
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  Jason Z

Y’know, I’ve thought a lot about those ’84-’85 Mets teams, and about letting Seaver go (again) after ’83. But somehow, I never thought about both things together. I may be a minority of one in that regard, but to me, you made an excellent point. 🙂

Jason Z
10 years ago
Reply to  John Autin

I have thought about it for 29 years. I thought about it alot in 1985 when the Mets finished 3GB the Cardinals. I just always thought that the influence of Seaver on all those young pitchers would have been huge. Plus, I have always been very impressed with Seaver’s 84 and 85 seasons. Seaver would have led by example, and the short and long term influence he would have had on Doc Gooden, Ron Darling, Walt Terrel and later Sid Fernandez would have been huge. The fact that the Mets got him back in 83, when he pitched well despite… Read more »

nightfly
10 years ago
Reply to  John Autin

I was just getting into baseball around ’82 or ’83 (my favorite player was Lee Mazzilli!), and had no idea who Tom Seaver was until later in life. I think the 70’s and 80’s were still very much the “dark ages” as far as statistical analysis and how it influenced player evaluations. No doubt the Mets thought “9-14? Pffff. And he’s old. It’s too bad but we have to make room for our young, promising pitchers.” Now, I always thought of this in the context of Seaver’s no-hitter for the White Sox and the Mets’ franchise futility in this accomplishment…… Read more »

Ed
Ed
10 years ago
Reply to  John Autin

To be fair, Seaver was horrible (for the Reds) in ’82. An ERA+ of 67. And while he bounced back a bit in ’83 (ERA+ of 103), I don’t think it’s unreasonable for at team to think that a 38/39 year old pitcher coming off of those two years, didn’t have much left.

Mike L
Mike L
10 years ago

That Braves number still jumps out at me. A more than 100 year-old franchise. Rick Camp, 56 wins

bstar
bstar
10 years ago
Reply to  Mike L

Yes, the Braves list is once again hilarious, with Rick Camp topping the list. Camp, a career .074 hitter with a -39 OPS+, famously extended the July 4, 1985 19-inning game against the Mets with a HR in the bottom of the 18th, the only four-bagger of Rick’s career, after the Mets had scored a run in the top of that inning to take the lead. Then, in more familiar Camp fashion, he gave up five more runs to the Mets in the top of the 19th and the Mets won, 16-13. One of the crazier games I can recall.

John Nacca
John Nacca
10 years ago
Reply to  bstar

And I watched the whole game on TBS….until 4:07 a.m…….then they set off the fireworks at Fulton County Stadium!

bstar
bstar
10 years ago
Reply to  John Nacca

I was staying over at a friend’s house and woke up in the middle of the night. I flipped on the game cos it was in the 12th or something when we went to bed. Amazingly, the game was still on at 3am so I got to see the Rick Camp homer. Yes, fireworks at 4:15 in the morning. I love it.

Evil Squirrel
10 years ago

Too bad Juan Agosto never played for the Brewers, he’d fit right in on that list….

Steven
Steven
10 years ago
Reply to  Evil Squirrel

When Agosto was with the Cardinals, most St. Louis fans wished he pitched for the Brewers…or anywhere else but St. Louis.

Jeff Allen
Jeff Allen
10 years ago

Interestingly enough, Lincecum and Cain both finished the 2011 season with exactly 69 wins.

Brent
Brent
10 years ago

Christy Mathewson and Lefty Gomez just missed this list for the Giants and Yankees respectively. Seems a little unfair in both cases.

Royals represent well in both HRs and wins. I would guess that Brett, White, Splitt and Leonard are the best foursome for any expansion team, especially if you take 2 hitters and 2 pitchers.

Lawrence Azrin
Lawrence Azrin
10 years ago
Reply to  Brent

Instead of limiting these lists to one-team players, you could lower the requirement to, say, 99% of PA or IP with one team This would include players such as Berra, Mathewson, and Gomez, who had a very short “end of career” season as their laast season.

Not being familiar with how the B-R P-I works, I’m going to guess that this would be a lot more difficult.

nightfly
10 years ago
Reply to  Lawrence Azrin

One guy who would certainly get in that way is Dave Stieb, who pitched 439 games for Toronto, and four games for the White Sox. I think in a case like this we should all agree “It Never Happened” and assign those four games to an imaginary person; the way film directors who want to disavow all involvement with a complete bomb give the credit to “Alan Smithee.” So Alan Smithee pitched four games for the White Sox, went 1-3 with a 6.02 ERA, and Stieb came back after a six-year layoff to pitch a few last games with the… Read more »

Jason Z
10 years ago
Reply to  nightfly

In regards to Seaver being left unprotected by the Mets after 83, I remember the story at the time being that
they never imagined another team would take him.

As it turned out the White Sox made a great move and
the Mets front office was embarassed.

deal
10 years ago

Under Phillies the Bob Miller Link is to the wrong Bob Miller. Should be this one

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/m/millebo02.shtml

rather than the one with about a dozen circled numbers in his uni section.

James Smyth
10 years ago

When he retires, Mariano Rivera will knock former New York Highlander Jack “Chief” or “Crab” Warhop off the Yankee list. Warhop was on the team from 1908 to 1915. He gave up Babe Ruth’s first two career homers, hit during two different games!

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/event_hr.cgi?id=ruthba01&t=b

Jason Z
10 years ago

Walter Johnson (Senators-Twins)
Bob Gibson (Cardinals)
Jim Palmer (Orioles-Browns)…

All their franchise win leaders with 269, 154 and 130
more wins then second best.

Next with 128 more wins than the runner-up is Steve Rogers. I wonder
if Steve Rogers had pitched his entire career for the Yankees how many
games he would have won.

John Autin
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  Jason Z

Jason – I can’t answer that question, but my Pythagorean estimation method sees Steve Rogers’s career record as 180-130 (based on his actual decisions), or 22 wins more than his actual total. He’s the 13th-biggest “gainer” by that method, out of almost 800 pitchers in the study.

Using the 2nd method (estimated decisions), Rogers comes out at 188-136, or +30 wins. He’s the 4th-biggest gainer by that method.

Dr. Remulak
Dr. Remulak
10 years ago

Does Jeff Innis have a plaque in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda?

Paul E
Paul E
10 years ago

Phillies leader Charlie Ferguson was called by Wilbert Robinson in 1931, “one of the five best he ever saw” at any position

Something really untimely about catching typhoid fever in 1888

Paul E
Paul E
10 years ago

Phillies leader Charlie Ferguson was called by Wilbert Robinson in 1931, “one of the five best he ever saw” at any position

Something really untimely about catching typhoid fever in 1888

Dr. Remulak
Dr. Remulak
10 years ago
Reply to  Paul E

The good news for Ferguson was his death at age 25 ensured he would be a one-team player, and thus immortalized in a blog 124 years later.

Paul E
Paul E
10 years ago

Sorry – i used to stutter as a child

Rico oetrocelli
Rico oetrocelli
10 years ago

Never heard of Chief Harder but he is interesting: Only pitcher to work 10 or more All-Star innings without allowing an earned run Only man in major league history to have both 20-year playing and coaching careers Only Walter Johnson and Ted Lyons pitched more seasons with one club Joe DiMaggio recalled that he had more difficulty batting against Harder than against just about any other pitcher. DiMaggio batted only .180 lifetime against him, striking out three times in one game in 1940. He was the only man to play 20 seasons for one franchise who is not an active… Read more »

Tim
Tim
10 years ago

James Shields? Drafted by Tampa in 2000, he’s never pitched for anyone else.

Pat O'Dougherty
Pat O'Dougherty
10 years ago

After reading this blog post, I posed this as a trivia question to a Met fan to name the winningest Met pitcher meeting your franchise criteria. One of his guesses was Randy Tate. Although Tate was not good enough to beat out Jeff Innis for #1, it seems to me that his 5 wins in 1975 as a Met (his one and only team and his one and only season in the majors), should put him on your Met list at #2.

birtelcom
Editor
10 years ago
Reply to  Andy

How about Bob Apodaca, at 16 wins for the Mets?

Andy
Andy
10 years ago

Hmm…uggh…not sure what happened here.

DCA
DCA
9 years ago

How did you generate this? This isn’t spam, despite what the filter might say.

Doug
Editor
9 years ago
Reply to  DCA
DCA
DCA
9 years ago
Reply to  Doug

I was afraid of that. Don’t have a PI subscription.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago

Doug: I clicked on that link. Tiny Bonham and Joe Page also pitched for the Pirates.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago

Doug: Looking at posts 67 and 68 I thought you were the one who published this blog topic. Now I see that Andy is the author and Bonham and Page are not on his list of winningest Yankees. Now I am wondering how you generated your list.
Also I assume DCA’s question is directed at Andy and now I am wondering how Andy generated the list. In the Pitching Team Finder there is no Franchises Played For option in the drop-down Choose a stat menu.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago
Reply to  Andy

Andy: I don’t know if this has been mentioned in one of the above comments but Brandon Webb, who played only for the Diamondbacks, has 87 wins.

Richard Chester
Richard Chester
9 years ago

Doug: I think I know what you did to generate that list. You selected American League only. Page, Bonham and a few others on that list also played for teams in the NL but not for other teams in the AL. That’s why they appeared n your list.