The Imperfect Trifecta or Singles Only, Please

Blogger Paul E pointed out that Jimmy Rollins and Juan Pierre are leading the Phillies attack this year with identical batting averages, on-base percentages and slugging percentages. That unusual trifecta is, of course, usually only accomplished when a player has no walks and no extra-base hits.

Rk Player H BB XBH Year Age Tm G PA AB R 2B 3B HR BA OBP SLG OPS Pos
9 Jimmy Rollins 6 0 0 2012 33 PHI 5 22 21 0 0 0 0 .286 .286 .286 .572 /*6
21 Juan Pierre 3 0 0 2012 34 PHI 4 14 14 0 0 0 0 .214 .214 .214 .428 /*7
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/12/2012.

After the jump, I’ll look a little more into this “phenomenon”.

To start, I wanted to see players with seasons having the fewest walks and extra-base hits relative to PAs. Here’s the list for the live ball era, showing seasons (min. 300 PA) since 1920 with OPS < BA x 2.25.

Rk Player OPS BA PA Year 6 Age Tm G AB R H 2B 3B HR BB OBP SLG Pos
1 Tony Womack .556 .249 351 2005 35 NYY 108 329 46 82 8 1 0 12 .276 .280 748D/9
2 Alex Sanchez .721 .322 352 2004 27 DET 79 332 41 107 9 3 2 7 .335 .386 *8/D
3 Alvaro Espinoza .633 .282 544 1989 27 NYY 146 503 51 142 23 1 0 14 .301 .332 *6
4 Kirby Puckett .655 .296 583 1984 24 MIN 128 557 63 165 12 5 0 16 .320 .336 *8
5 Darrell Brown .601 .272 323 1983 27 MIN 91 309 40 84 6 2 0 10 .297 .304 *8/7D
6 Tim Foli .563 .252 349 1983 32 CAL 88 330 29 83 10 0 2 5 .263 .300 *65
7 Doug Flynn .504 .225 485 1982 31 TOT 146 463 26 104 12 4 0 8 .236 .268 *46
8 Gene Clines .620 .276 480 1976 29 TEX 116 446 52 123 12 3 0 16 .304 .316 *7D/89
9 Danny Thompson .482 .219 318 1970 23 MIN 96 302 25 66 9 0 0 7 .234 .248 *45/6
10 Horace Clarke .512 .230 607 1968 28 NYY 148 579 52 133 6 1 2 23 .258 .254 *4
11 Hal Lanier .461 .206 518 1968 25 SFG 151 486 37 100 14 1 0 12 .222 .239 *6
12 Don Kessinger .608 .274 578 1966 23 CHC 150 533 50 146 8 2 1 26 .306 .302 *6
13 Bobby Richardson .573 .256 320 1957 21 NYY 97 305 36 78 11 1 0 9 .274 .298 *4
14 Dick Groat .632 .284 415 1952 21 PIT 95 384 38 109 6 1 1 19 .319 .313 *6
15 Emil Verban .635 .289 363 1949 33 CHC 98 343 38 99 11 1 0 8 .309 .327 *4
16 Chile Gomez .515 .232 358 1936 27 PHI 108 332 24 77 4 1 0 14 .265 .250 *46
17 Jimmy Jordan .603 .278 312 1935 27 BRO 94 295 26 82 7 0 0 9 .302 .302 46/5
18 Otis Miller .610 .272 413 1931 30 BOS 107 389 38 106 12 1 0 15 .301 .308 *54
19 Tommy Thevenow .642 .286 624 1930 26 PHI 156 573 57 164 21 1 0 23 .316 .326 *6
20 Moe Berg .630 .287 385 1929 27 CHW 107 352 32 101 7 0 0 17 .323 .307 *2
21 Freddy Spurgeon .642 .287 405 1925 23 CLE 107 376 50 108 9 3 0 15 .315 .327 *54/6
22 Mickey O’Neil .538 .246 382 1924 24 BSN 106 362 32 89 4 1 0 14 .276 .262 *2
23 Walter Holke .651 .291 424 1922 29 BSN 105 395 35 115 9 4 0 14 .317 .334 *3
24 George Maisel .673 .310 431 1921 29 CHC 112 393 54 122 7 2 0 11 .334 .338 *8
25 Walter Schmidt .628 .282 417 1921 34 PIT 114 393 30 111 9 3 0 12 .307 .321 *2
26 Otto Miller .644 .289 324 1920 31 BRO 90 301 16 87 9 2 0 9 .312 .332 *2
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/11/2012.

Interesting list. Everything from a HOFer, to one of the all-time leading out-makers (Lanier), to the player with the all-time lowest WAR (Flynn) for a 4000 PA career. And, look at all the guys batting .280 or better.

Some notes:

  • Everyone on the list has walks in less than 5% of PAs. Foli, Flynn and Sanchez have walks in less than 2% of PAs.
  • Everyone on the list has walks of less than 20% of Hits. Foli, Sanchez, Flynn, Verban, Maisel, Puckett and Espinoza have walks of less than 10% of Hits.
  • Maisel, Foli, Flynn and O’Neil all have extra-base hits plus walks of less than 5% of PAs.
  • O’Neil, Gomez, Clarke and Berg all have extra-base hits of less than 7% of total Hits.

There have been 67 times in the game-searchable era that players (excluding pitchers) have started a season with 10 or more hits before recording a walk or an extra-base hit. No player has done this more than once. Here are the longest such streaks, by number of hits, to start a player’s season (note that OBP may vary from BA due to HBP or SF).

Player Strk Start Strk End Games AB H BA OBP SLG OPS Tm
Tom Veryzer 1981-04-11 1981-05-17 23 70 20 0.286 0.292 0.286 0.577 CLE
Ed Madjeski 1933-04-13 1933-06-26 23 68 19 0.279 0.279 0.279 0.559 PHA
Wayne Tolleson 1985-04-17 1985-05-31 18 57 19 0.333 0.333 0.333 0.667 TEX
Bill Killefer 1921-05-05 1921-06-22 14 49 17 0.347 0.347 0.347 0.694 CHC
Ellie Rodriguez 1973-04-06 1973-05-31 20 58 17 0.293 0.305 0.293 0.598 MIL
Charlie Hargreaves 1923-06-27 1923-10-02 18 50 16 0.320 0.320 0.320 0.640 BRO
Kevin Barker 1999-08-19 1999-09-04 15 49 16 0.327 0.320 0.327 0.647 MIL
Marshall Edwards 1983-04-15 1983-07-29 22 58 16 0.276 0.276 0.276 0.552 MIL
Ty Cline 1966-04-12 1966-09-15 32 49 16 0.327 0.327 0.327 0.653 CHC-ATL
Adam Kennedy 2005-05-02 2005-05-22 17 56 14 0.250 0.263 0.250 0.513 LAA
Chuck Hiller 1966-04-19 1966-06-07 26 39 14 0.359 0.390 0.359 0.749 NYM
Emmanuel Burriss 2011-04-28 2011-06-11 19 53 14 0.264 0.264 0.264 0.528 SFG
Frank Duffy 1975-04-18 1975-05-03 14 53 14 0.264 0.264 0.264 0.528 CLE
Fred Vaughn 1945-04-20 1945-05-31 17 58 14 0.241 0.241 0.241 0.483 WSH
Lee Gamble 1938-04-22 1938-06-06 14 41 14 0.341 0.341 0.341 0.683 CIN
Overton Tremper 1927-06-16 1927-10-02 24 60 14 0.233 0.246 0.233 0.479 BRO
Walter Mueller 1926-08-31 1926-09-21 16 49 14 0.286 0.286 0.286 0.571 PIT
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/11/2012.

Removing the start of season restriction, here are the players who have gone at least 90 consecutive PAs without a walk or extra-base hit. Notice that Aurelio Rodriguez (second from bottom) had a streak lasting 366 days!

Player Strk Start Strk End Games AB Hits BA OBP SLG OPS   Tm
Bob Lillis 1963-06-24 1963-08-10 40 143 22 0.154 0.171 0.154 0.325 HOU
Bob Lillis 1961-07-18 1962-04-24 36 124 28 0.226 0.226 0.226 0.452 STL-HOU
Ivy Olson 1920-04-26 1920-05-28 22 110 22 0.200 0.200 0.200 0.400 BRO
Everett Scott 1924-05-17 1924-06-18 28 109 29 0.266 0.266 0.266 0.532 NYY
Paul Casanova 1967-09-30 1968-05-30 30 109 14 0.128 0.127 0.128 0.256 WSA
Tommy Helms 1969-08-15 1969-09-18 28 103 24 0.233 0.233 0.233 0.466 CIN
Junior Ortiz 1983-06-20 1983-08-19 36 102 25 0.245 0.245 0.245 0.490 NYM
Ollie O’Mara 1918-05-18 1918-06-24 28 102 17 0.167 0.190 0.167 0.357 BRO
Woody Jensen 1937-09-10 1937-10-02 23 100 25 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.500 PIT
Bill Mazeroski 1963-08-27 1963-09-20 25 98 13 0.133 0.133 0.133 0.265 PIT
Ryan Theriot 2010-05-05 2010-06-04 24 96 18 0.188 0.204 0.188 0.392 CHC
Enos Cabell 1979-05-23 1979-06-25 24 95 21 0.221 0.221 0.221 0.442 HOU
Bill Buckner 1984-09-05 1984-09-30 24 94 23 0.245 0.240 0.245 0.484 BOS
Mickey O’Neil 1924-04-28 1924-05-30 24 93 21 0.226 0.226 0.226 0.452 BSN
Jay Hankins 1961-05-28 1961-08-24 31 92 16 0.174 0.174 0.174 0.348 KCA
Aurelio Rodriguez 1982-09-29 1983-09-29 40 89 10 0.112 0.121 0.112 0.233 CHW-BAL
Freddy Sanchez 2009-08-08 2010-05-20 22 87 23 0.264 0.258 0.264 0.523 SFG
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/11/2012.

Finally, these are the players since 1901 to finish a season with 8 or more hits, and identical BA, OBP and SLG numbers.

Rk Player H BA OBP SLG Year Age Tm G PA AB R RBI SO SH SF GDP Pos
1 Frank Sigafoos 11 .256 .256 .256 1926 22 PHA 13 44 43 4 2 3 1 *6
2 Kelly Dransfeldt 10 .333 .333 .333 2004 29 CHW 15 30 30 5 4 6 0 0 0 /*65D
3 Brian Doyle 10 .192 .192 .192 1978 23 NYY 39 54 52 6 0 3 2 0 2 *4/65
4 Josh Billings 10 .217 .217 .217 1921 29 SLB 20 47 46 2 4 7 1 *2
5 Nelson Liriano 9 .409 .409 .409 1991 27 KCR 10 23 22 5 1 2 1 0 0 *4
6 Walt Hriniak 9 .346 .346 .346 1968 25 ATL 9 26 26 0 3 3 0 0 0 /*2
7 Carl Boles 9 .375 .375 .375 1962 27 SFG 19 25 24 4 1 6 1 0 2 /7
8 Donie Bush 9 .409 .409 .409 1923 35 WSH 12 34 22 6 0 1 5 /*54
9 Ryan Sweeney 8 .229 .229 .229 2006 21 CHW 18 35 35 1 5 7 0 0 1 /879D
10 Bob Schroder 8 .242 .242 .242 1966 21 SFG 10 35 33 0 2 2 2 0 1 /*6
11 Sammy Meeks 8 .229 .229 .229 1951 28 CIN 23 35 35 4 2 4 0 2 /56
12 Hal Anderson 8 .250 .250 .250 1932 28 CHW 9 33 32 4 2 1 1 /*8
13 Dick Spalding 8 .348 .348 .348 1928 34 WSH 16 25 23 1 0 4 2 /*79
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 4/12/2012.

 

55 thoughts on “The Imperfect Trifecta or Singles Only, Please

  1. 1
    Timmy Pea says:

    I think JRoll will rack up some XBH’s, and he probably won’t walk too much. I think Pierre has only started 2 games. Don’t get carried away Doug.

    • 2
      Timmy Pea says:

      And there you go, the Phils scratch out a win with great pitching and a patched up lineup.

    • 3
      Neil L. says:

      Timmy, don’t miss the point of Doug’s blog.

      The fact that Juan Pierre’s name crops up in the same blog as the lists of no-names provided by Doug is not a good thing.

      I hesitate to make any comment about Juan Pierre’s current presence on a ML roster, for fear you might take it personally.

  2. 4
    Timmy Pea says:

    Well I disagree with Doug that Pierre is “leading the attack”. He’s started 2 games. Victorino hit lead off tonight and banged a HR. The Phils are hurt and sometimes you gotta go to war with the army you got. I like going to war with that pitching staff regardless of the lineup. I understand Doug is making a point that the lack of walks and XBH’s is a recipe for disaster.

    • 6
      Neil L. says:

      Timmy, by saying that a lack of walks and XBHs is a recipe for sitting on the bench is bad you are showing good baseball judgement.

      At risk of speaking for Doug, by saying that Juan Pierre is “leading the attack”, he is making a point about the Phil’s poor early-season offense, not about Pierre’s effectiveness as an offensive force.

      (At least I think so.)

      Doug?

      • 13
        Doug says:

        Actually, it was nothing more than the comment Paul E posted yesterday. I just thought it was interesting having identical slash components.

        But, having two out machines in your line-up is most likely at least one too many.

  3. 5
    Timmy Pea says:

    Johnny Damon is back in baseball and headed to 3,000! Good luck JD!

    • 11
      Ed says:

      I was going to post something about Johnny Damon signing! Will be interesting to see how often he plays. With Acta as the manager, I doubt Damon plays more than 80% of the time. (Acta loves rotating players in and out of the lineup). Damon also has an opt-out clause once Sizemore returns.

  4. 7
    Neil L. says:

    Doug, Alvaro Espinoza is the statistical spitting image of Juan Pierre, except he probably had a stronger throwing arm.

    Only shortstops could justify stat lines like Espinoza’s or Don Kessinger’s.

    It is mind-blowing, to me, that, in the era that Cal-Ripken was re-defining the position, Alvaro could consume so many plate appearances as a shortstop in the Yankees lineup with so little productivity.

    Are you kidding me? 14 BB in 544 plate appearances? Did he ever see a pitch he didn’t like?

    Thanks for the study, Doug. There is more for me to digest in the study.

    • 16
      Doug says:

      Espinoza was just following in the Yankee tradition of Horace Clarke, he of the 607 PAs and 9 XBH. That’s only a 24 point spread between BA and SLG.

      But it’s not just middle infielders. There’s also… rookie CFers. Puckett outdid Espinoza with 39 more PAs and a 40 point spread between BA and SLG (it was 50 spread for Espinoza).

      And Foli and Flynn each had only an 11 point spread between BA and OBP. Talk about never seeing a pitch you don’t like.

      • 40
        Hartvig says:

        And of course, old Horace was just picking up the torch passed down by Bobby Richardson with an OPS in 1960 & ’61 of .601 & .610 respectively in over 1200 plate appearances, mostly in the lead off spot.

        • 41
          Doug says:

          I see that Richardson’s .573 OPS (58 OPS+) in 1957 (the year he made the list here) earned him an All-Star selection???

          But, Richardson and Gus Triandos sat, as their positions were the only ones where the starters (Fox and Berra) played the whole game.

          • 43
            Neil L. says:

            Imagine the outcry, in this day and age, if an all-star manager allowed one player to play the entire game at the expense of another at the same position?

            Nice catch on Bobby Richardson, and his all-star selection, Doug. And at age 21.

            Bobby Richardson only played 97 games that year. Presumably he was injured after the all-star game and didn’t play a full season? It is not many plate appearances for an all-star.

          • 44
            Doug says:

            Actually, I looked again at the box.

            Stengel also had Kaline and Mantle play the whole game. But, he sat down Williams. Only 19 of the 25 AL players appeared.

            On the NL side, Alston had Mays, Musial and Aaron play the whole game, and he used 21 of his 25 guys.

          • 45
            Richard Chester says:

            Reply to #41: As of 7/2 of that year Richardson was batting .301 and Casey Stengel was selecting the reserve All-Stars

          • 46
            Neil L. says:

            Doug @44,

            So it was the all-star norm in the fifties to ride the game’s established stars for the entire game and leave younger all-stars on the bench.

            How were players selected to the all-star back then?

            Ah, for a return to a time where television didn’t rule the game, where big money didn’t talk and where fans didn’t “stuff” on-line ballot boxes.

          • 47
            Richard Chester says:

            Reply to #46:

            It’s really weird that you mentioned fans stuffing the ballot for the AS game. That year fans voted for the players and a Cincinnati newspaper headed up campaign for the fans to vote frequently for Reds players. As a result 7 of the 8 AS starters were from the Reds: George Crowe, Johnny Temple, Roy McMillan, Don Hoak, Ed Bailey, Frank Robinson and Wally Post. The other player was Stan Musial. Commissioner Ford Frick used his power to replace Crowe and Post with Willie Mays and Hank Aaron.

          • 48
            Neil L. says:

            Richard @47, I honestly didn’t know that about the 1957 season.

            So some things never change. 🙂

            In this connected world one city’s market can still influence the all-star roster. Hmmm …..

        • 42
          Mike L says:

          For the record, I think it’s unreasonably cruel to be putting Horace Clarke and Alvaro Espinoza in the same post. Childhood nightmares and adult bad dreams.

  5. 8
    bstar says:

    Doug, Braves reserve outfielder Jose Constanza is trending toward making a couple of your lists. Since August 20th, 2011 when he innocently drew a walk in the fourth inning, Constanza has 6 singles in 42 plate appearances, for a stunning slash line of .143/.143/.143. Braves nation was horrified to see Jose pinch-hitting in high leverage situations a couple of times early this year; fortunately, Constanza was sent down to AAA when Chipper came back into the lineup two days ago.

  6. 10
    Paul E says:

    Doug:
    Another statistical oddity (perhaps?): Matt Kemp is batting .429 with a .414 OBA in 28 PA through the 5th inning tonight. Zero BB’s – just like Charlie Manuel’s table setters; except Kemp is slugging .750 . I imagine George Sisler may have pulled this off (.400 BA/ 0 walks/ 28 PA’s) in one of his pre-eye-injury seasons? Or even Jeff Francouer?

    • 14
      Doug says:

      That would be kind of interesting to look at – the longest streak to start a season without a walk, and the best BA to go with it.

      I’ll post what I find.

    • 27
      Doug says:

      Paul,

      You are bang on about Sisler. In 1925, he had the highest BA (.419) among players to have at least 100 AB without a walk to start a season.

      Christian Guzman (.381) in 2009 and Jeff Francoeur (.379) in 2005 aren’t far behind.

      • 28
        Richard Chester says:

        Sisler did that in a post-eye-injury season. He missed the 1923 season with his eye-sinus condition.

      • 33
        Paul E says:

        I was just guessing. I know Bill James in the BJHBA talked about Sisler’s “hollow” .340; however, he did state he thought he may have approached Cobb’s lifetime BA of .367 if it weren’t for the sinus condition. Francoeur generally starts out hot and swings at everything and anything close.

        If I could ever figure out that PI…..

        • 39
          Lawrence Azrin says:

          I think James guessed a .362 lifetime BA and about 3800 hits for Sisler without the mid-career illness. That’s probably as realistic as James’ projection of Hank Greenberg hitting 611 career HR, instead of his actual 331.

          Paul E., that was an amazing guess.

          The “what-if?” game is sure fun, huh?

          • 51
            Paul E says:

            ” “Paul E., that was an amazing guess” ”

            Yeah, but you haven’t seen my $^#@&*! stock portfolio. Over the last twenty-five years I have probably received class-action law suits in the mail on about a dozen stocks I’ve owned – and, believe me, you don’t get those items in the mail if you’ve made the correct guesses…

            Regarding James’ “favorite toy”, I believe he had Canseco going for about 600 lifetime home runs and Ruben Sierra knocking in 2,000 runs

  7. 12
    Ed says:

    Ah Tom Veryzer. As an Indian’s fan, that name brings back memories! And not in a good way. Nothing says your franchise is clueless more than trading for a guy coming off a 30 OPS+ season and installing him as your regular shortstop. For 4 seasons! And Veryzer’s DP partner for much of the time was Duane Kuiper, he of the infamous one home run in 3,754 PAs. That has to be one of the worst, multi-year DP combos ever.

    • 15
      Doug says:

      Actually, Kuiper was on the second list, twice, until I realized I ran the query wrong and was only selecting streak games with an AB. But, even so, he’s probably not too far removed from this company.

      Until you mentioned it, I had forgotten about Kuiper and the one home run. Even when he popped up on my list, I recognized the name, but the one home run (which did get a fair bit of notoriety at the time) didn’t register.

      Getting old, I guess.

      • 17
        Ed says:

        Kuiper’s one home run was off of Steve Stone. I suppose if you’re only going to hit one home run in your career, it’s best to hit it off of a future Cy Young winner.

        BTW, one thing that jumps out at me on his B-Ref page are his salaries. They only list two: $40,000 in 1977 and $67,500 in 1979. (those correspond to $150,000 and $210,000 in today’s dollars). Hard to believe that 30-35 years ago, a MLB starter could make so little. Particularly someone who was in his 3rd and 5th seasons as a starter. Nowadays, the minimum is $480,000 and I doubt there’s a starting second baseman in his 3rd and 5th seasons who’s making less than $1 million.

        • 18
          Doug says:

          I remember attending a game at Cleveland Stadium in the summer of ’78 (me and about 70,000 empty seats). I really don’t remember what the ticket cost, but I’d bet it was less than 5 bucks. So, that’s changed too.

          • 20
            Ed says:

            Reminds me of going to a Cleveland Cavaliers’ basketball game in 1991. We paid $10 for tickets and we didn’t even buy the cheapest tickets. And this was for a playoff game no less.

          • 25
            Neil L. says:

            The cavernous Cleveland stadium. Wasn’t it Cleveland Municipal or Cleeland Memorial stadium?

          • 29
            Richard Chester says:

            Reply to #25. It was Cleveland Municipal Stadium or, also, Cleveland Stadium..

          • 31
            Ed says:

            Come on…everyone knows the name of the stadium was “The Mistake on the Lake”!

          • 37
            Neil L. says:

            Ed @31, I was resisting the us of that moniker in deferences to Clevelanders everywhere. 🙂

          • 38
            Neil L. says:

            @37 oops us = use

        • 19
          Doug says:

          I see that Emil Verban on this list also had just 1 career HR, and in 3109 PAs. He got his HR off Johnny Vandermeer in 1948.

          Verban actually had a longer homerless streak before hitting his HR than Kuiper did after hitting his – 2595 PA to 1786 PA.

          • 21
            Ed says:

            And it looks like Tom Oliver has the most PAs (2073) with no home runs (position players only). Jack McCarthy actually comes up first in the search results but he hit 4 homeruns in 1898 and 1899.

        • 26
          Lawrence Azrin says:

          RE: Placing Duane Kuiper’s salary in context:

          An MLB “minimum salary” was first established as $6,000 in 1946, where it stayed for more than two(!) decades. Before that, the minimum was apparently the least that a team could pay.

          The source for the info below is the blog “NYYfans”, and “thecaptain”, posting 02-07-2005 @11:30AM

          YEAR MINIMUM AVERAGE
          1967 $6,000 $19,000
          1968 10,000 NA
          1969 10,000 24,909
          1970 12,000 29,303
          1971 12,750 31,543
          1972 13,500 34,092
          1973 15,000 36,566
          1974 15,000 40,839
          1975 16,000 44,676
          1976 19,000 51,501

          1977 19,000 76,066 KUIPER: $40,000

          1978 21,000 99,876

          1979 21,000 113,558 KUIPER: $40,000

          1980 30,000 143,756
          1981 32,500 185,651
          1982 33,500 241,497
          1983 35,000 289,194
          1984 40,000 329,408
          1985 60,000 371,571
          1986 60,000 412,520
          1987 62,500 412,454
          1988 62,500 438,729
          1989 68,000 497,254
          1990 100,000 597,537
          1991 100,000 851,492
          1992 109,000 1,028,667
          1993 109,000 1,076,089
          1994 109,000 1,168,263
          1995 109,000 1,110,766
          1996 122,667 1,119,981
          1997 150,000 1,336,609
          1998 170,000 1,398,831
          1999 200,000 1,611,166
          2000 200,000 1,895,630

      • 22
        RJ says:

        As a Giants fan it’s impossible to forget about Kuip’s one home run as it comes up every other broadcast. To really rub it in, his co-commentator (pitcher) Mike Krukow had five.

  8. 23

    Moe Berg! Is is time for the baseball players who were spies post?

    • 24
      Neil L. says:

      Wine,

      Another former B-Ref poster. I remember your distinctive screen name, now,

      I’ve only been around in HHS for about a week, but good to hear from you.

    • 30
      Lawrence Azrin says:

      I’m going to guess that Berg is the _only_ twentieth-century MLB player who was also a spy.

      There are two excellent books out about his amazing career(s):
      1972 -“Moe Berg: Athlete, Scholar, Spy” by Barbara Fitzgerald
      1994 – “The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg” by Nicholas Dawidoff

  9. 32
    Lawrence Azrin says:

    #31/ED –

    RE: Cleveland Municipal Stadium – I think that in the mid-80s, Oil Can Boyd had a quote to the affect that “…that’s what you get for building a ballpark next to the ocean.”

    • 34
      Paul E says:

      What’s incredible about the Cleveland Indians is how Jacobs Field (?)turned the franchise fortunes around for about ten years or so. They must have had, at one time or another, 4 Hall of Famers (Thome, Manny, Roberto Alomar, Jeff Kent) and many very good players in their everyday lineup – Brian Giles, Lofton,Justice, Belle, Juan Gonzalez, Vizquel, Travis Fryman, Matt Williams, Marquis Grissom, etc…..

      • 36
        Ed says:

        Paul E: Actually I would say that the fortunes changed based on some astute drafting (Ramirez, Thome, Belle, Nagy) and trades (Baerga, Lofton, Alomar, Vizquel). That was the core of the team that went to the WS in ’95. The fact that the fortunes of the team turned right around the time of the new stadium was coincidence more than anything.

        • 55
          Lawrence Azrin says:

          The fact that the Cleveland Brown NFL team moved to Baltimore after the 1995 seasonalso helped the Indians attendence quitea bit, I’d imagine.

    • 35
  10. 49
    John Autin says:

    Casey Kotchman has the “trifecta” going — 3 singles in 25 trips, no walks.

  11. 52
    John Williams says:

    Juan Pierre could be the last player of his type. The tiny guy, slap-hitter, free swinging outfielder/lead off man. The ones who are 150 pounds soaking wet; as the cliche goes. I always liked seeing Juan Pierre play, it has to be the Muggsy Bogues thing I have as a short man.

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